Search result(s) - buta

butá

Hiligaynon

Blind, sightless; to become totally blind. Nagbutá na siá? Has he gone quite-, totally-, blind? Has he quite lost his sight? (see lamón).



butâ

Hiligaynon

(B) Full, filled, replenished, charged. Butâ na ang láta. The can is full. Sang piésta butâ gid ang simbáhan sang mga táo. On the feast-day the church was quite filled with people. (see punô).


bútà

Hiligaynon

(B) To fill, charge, replenish. Butáa ang báso. Fill up the glass. Ginbútà níya ang ákon báso sing tínto. He charged my glass with red table-wine. Ibútà mo akó siníng báso. Please fill this glass for me. (see punô).


bulág

Hiligaynon

Blind in one eye, one-eyed, but also used to imply total blindness. (see lamón, butá-totally blind).


butá-búta

Hiligaynon

Blindman's buff. Nagahámpang silá sang butábúta. They are playing blindman's buff. Sín-o ang butábúta? Who is the blind man? (see butá).


butâ-bútà

Hiligaynon

Dim. of butâ. Nearly full; to nearly fill.


butádo

Hiligaynon

Full, satisfied, satiated, replete, not hungry. (From butâ with a Spanish suffix).


kátà

Hiligaynon

(B) To be full, brim-, chock-, choke-, full, replete, replenished, crammed, stuffed. Nagakátà ang túbig sang ísdà, ang bólsa sang tinápay, etc. The water is full of fish, the pocket is crammed with bread, etc. (see punô, butâ).


lamón

Hiligaynon

Quite blind, stone-blind, blind in both eyes, bereft of sight, sightless; to be blind, etc. Lamón siá. He is quite blind. Naglamón siá. He went quite blind. (see butá, bulág-blind in one eye, half-blind, one-eyed).


Full to overflowing, crammed, stuffed, choke-full. (see búngbung, bát-al, punô, butâ).


mabát-al

Hiligaynon

Crammed, stuffed full, chock-full, choke-full, bulging out. (see bát-at, mabáknal, punô, butâ).


múka

Hiligaynon

To be full, crammed, stuffed. Kon nagamúka ang ímo bâbâ índì ka maghámbal. Don't talk with a full mouth. (see punô, butâ, bát-al, báknal).


súlput

Hiligaynon

To clean out a tube, etc. by pushing a feather, straw, piece of wood, or the like, through it. Sulputá ang lágtok sa ímo húnsoy (sa sánsoy mo). Clean the dirt out of your pipe or cigarholder. Ginasúlput níya (na) ang húnsoy, kay (sánsoy, hay) mapín-ot. He cleaned the stem of his pipe, because it did not draw well. Isúlput iníng bagát sa túbo nga salsálon, kay punô sang ságbot. (Isúlput diáng bagát sa túbo nga salsálon, hay butâ kang rámò). Push this pole through the iron tube, for it is full of rubbish. (see súlsug).


tamúng

Hiligaynon

(B) A cover for the face, mask, vizor, face-guard of a helmet; to blindfold, bandage the eyes, hoodwink (especially in the game of butábúta (Blindman's buff, Blind Harry). Sín-o ang natámngan (butábúta, butá)? Who was blindfolded? Who was "blindman"? Támngi nínyo (tána). (Bugkusí nínyo sing pányò ang íya mga matá). Blindfold him.


tók-ap

Hiligaynon

To shake swiftly in the air; to strike, flick, knock, wipe, brush something off with a towel or the like. Itók-ap ang pányò nga punô (butâ) sang yáb-ok. Shake the handkerchief that is full of dust. Tok-apí sang pányò mo ang lamésa, kay madámù ang yáb-ok. Wipe the table with your handkerchief, for it is covered with dust.


tugúb

Hiligaynon

Full, replete, filled; to fill, flood, brim, fill to overflowing; make overflow. Natugúb (Nagkatugúb, tugúb) ang íya tagiposóon sang kalípay. His heart is overflowing with joy. Ginatugúb siá sang kasubô. He is filled with sorrow. (see punô, butâ).


alabútan

Hiligaynon

(H) Place of arrival, goal, end to be reached or come to. (abút).


arabútay

Hiligaynon

(B) To be at ease or rest, feel comfortable, etc. Mostly used with a negative. Indì siá maarabútay túbtub nga matápus iníng gamó. He cannot rest, will not feel easy, till this trouble is over. (see libútay id.).


butád

Hiligaynon

Dark brown, dun-colored, brown turning nearly black.


butáka

Hiligaynon

(Sp. butaca) A comfortable, commodious chair, a good seat in a theatre, etc.


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