Search result(s) - diwán-on

balá-on

Hiligaynon

(B) A small basket without handles. (see balâ-balâ).



balálaw

Hiligaynon

A cover or lid made of palm-leaves. It is chiefly used on tuba-containers (baláding) to prevent the tuba from spilling when being carried to the market.


balás-on

Hiligaynon

(H) That is to be wetted or soaked in water. Balás on sa palígos. Bathing-dress, costume for a bath or swim. (see basâ).


balátik

Hiligaynon

A covered pit set with sharp spikes; a kind of trap with a spring attached to a sharp-pointed spike which pierces the victim that steps on the trap. Naglikáw sa súyak kag sa balátik kaámbak. He avoided the sharp pegs and jumped down into the spiked pit, i.e. he fell out of the frying pan into the fire. Gindakúp níla ang talunón sa balátik. They caught the wild pig in the spring-trap.


baláyan

Hiligaynon

A large piece of wood, a rafter, especially the length of timber that rests on the wall and reaches to the roof-tree or ridge. The laths or stringers (hawák, anamán) are nailed horizontally across the rafters.


bále

Hiligaynon

(Sp. vale) A credit-note, chit; to be worth, to cost. Ang kusúg ni Pédro bále tátlo ni Huán. Peter is three times as strong as John. Iníng baláy bále isá ka líbo ka mángmang. This house is worth a thousand pesos. Baléhi lang ang baláklon mo. Just sign a credit-note for the goods you wish to buy. Buy on tick.


bálik

Hiligaynon

To come back, return, go back to the place one came from. Nagbálik siá sa Ilóng-ílong. He went back to Iloilo. Balíkon mo ang maléta nga nalipatán ko. Go back and fetch the handbag I forgot. Balíki si Hosé. Return to José. Ginbálik níya ang pílak nga íya ginhulám. He returned the money he had borrowed. Ibálik mo na ang líbro ko. Now at last give me back my book. Ipabálik lang inâ sa íya. Just send that back to him. Binalíkan níya ang ámon baláy, kay bangúd sang bahâ walâ siá makatabók sa subâ. He came back again to our house, for on account of the freshet he could not cross the river. Binalíkan pa gid sang idô ang diótay nga kárne nga íya nabilín. The dog went back again to the little meat he had left. (see úlì, buélta, panumbalík).


balíkas

Hiligaynon

(H) Scratch, excoriation, abrasion; to excoriate, scratch, lacerate, tear, chafe, wound the skin. Nabalíkas ang ákon bútkon sang símsim. My arm got scratched by the bamboo-branches. Ginbalíkas níya ang ákon guyá sang sibít. He scratched my face with the pin. Nabalikásan ang ákon písngi; ambót kon anó ang nakabalíkas. My cheek got scratched; I don't know what caused the scratches. Andam ka dirâ, kay básì mabalikásan ka sang tunúk (dúgi). Be on the lookout there, for you may get injured by the thorns. (see báklis, lísgis).


balikíd

Hiligaynon

To turn one's head and look back, to look behind; to revert to, be concerned about, have one's mind engrossed. Balíkda siá. Look back at him. Indì ka magbalikíd sa simbáhan. Don't look behind you in church. May ginabalíkdan akó sa baláy. I have something at home that engrosses my mind, that turns my thoughts towards home. Ibalikíd akó ánay sang ákon mga bátà. Kindly look after my children for me. Anó ang ginabalíkdan mo? What makes you thoughtful? What is on your mind? What are you concerned about? Anó ang ginabalikíd mo? What are you looking back for? Why are you turning your head and looking back?


Contortion, twisting of the limbs; to writhe, to twist the limbs, as when suffering from cramp, cold, great fear and the like. Nagabalikótot siá. He is contorting his limbs. Ginabalikótot níla ang íla mga láwas sa dakû nga katúgnaw. They are writhing on account of the great cold. Pasilónga ang báka, dì mo siá pagpabalikototón sa ulán. Put the cow under shelter, don't let her shiver with cold out in the rain.


balíndò

Hiligaynon

To move, roll, or turn in all directions; to bewilder with questions, etc. Ginbalindoán sang masakít ang íya nga kátre. The sick person is constantly moving or turning on the bed. Dî mo siá pagbalindoón. Do not keep turning him. Ginbalíndò ang testígos sang abogádo. The lawyer plied the witness with many questions. (see pasibúdsíbud).


balióg

Hiligaynon

A kind of neckcloth or collar worn by Philippine women; to wear or use such a neckcloth. Iníng babáe nagabalióg. This woman wears a neckcloth. Baliogá lang iníng hénero. Just make a neckcloth of this stuff. Baliogí sía. Put a neckcloth on her. Pabaliogí siá. Provide her with a neckcloth. Ginbalióg níya ang ákon balióg. She wore my collar.


balískad

Hiligaynon

Upside down, inverted; to turn upside down, invert, turn topsy-turvy. Balískad iní. This is upside down. This is putting the cart before the horse. Baliskará (-adá) ang pínggan. Turn the plate upside down. Baliskarí akó sing isá ka tápa nga nagatúngtung sa bága. Turn over for me a slice of dried meat lying on the coals. Dî mo pagbaliskarón ang ímo mga buluhatón. Keep order in your work or in the performance of your duties. Don't do first what should be done last or vice versa.


balít

Hiligaynon

To whet, grind, sharpen, hone, put an edge on; to incite, urge, set on. Balitá ang labáha (nabáha). Sharpen the razor. Ibalít akó ánay sang ákon nabáha. Please, sharpen my razor for me. Indì mo siá pagbalitón sa pagpakigáway. Don't incite him to fight. (see báid).


balít-ad

Hiligaynon

(H) To fall on one's back, tumble down, tilt-, go-, turn-, topple-, over. (see tikháyà, tingkáyà, kayâ).


balitáng

Hiligaynon

Anything that tightens, stiffens, clasps, holds something together: brace, clamp, clasp, manacle, shackles; the piece of wood on either side of a hammock. (see balískog, bánting, pángkog).


bálon

Hiligaynon

Provisions or food-supplies for a journey; to take provisions along. Nagbálon akó sing tápa. I took dried meat along for the trip. Balóna iníng kán-on. Take this cooked rice with you for the journey. Balóni siá sing pinákas. Give him dried salt fish along as a provision for the journey. Pabalóni siá sing pinákas. Provide him with dried salt fish for the trip. Ipabálon ko sa íla iníng búgsò nga kárne. I will give them this piece of meat along for the trip.


balotanóg

Hiligaynon

Not well done, underdone, parboiled, not sufficiently cooked (of food); healing slowly (of ulcers, etc); desultory, unsatisfactory (of schooling, education, etc.). Also used as a verb. Iníng kán-on balotanóg. This rice is not sufficiently cooked. Ang bakokáng balotanóg. The carbuncle called "bakokáng" is slow in healing. Balotanóg gid lámang ang íya panoón. His schooling was very desultory or quite insufficient. Dílì mo pagpabalotanogón ang pagtíg-ang. Don't only half-cook the rice. (see angól-angól, akúl-akúl).


bálsa

Hiligaynon

(Sp. balsa) Raft, ferry-boat; to make or use a raft, ferry-boat. Nakatabók kamí sang subâ sa isá ka bálsa. We were able to cross the river on a raft. Balsahá ang mga kawáyan nga pulúnton. Make a raft of the bamboos for making fish-traps, and float them down the river. Balsahí si Fuláno sing kawáyan. Float some bamboo raft-wise down the river for N.N. Ibálsa akó siníng mga bólò. Float these bolo-canes raft-wise down the river for me.


balúd

Hiligaynon

A wave, billow, surge, swell, surf, breaker, comber, beach-comber, ripple; to be ruffled, be a little rough (of the sea); to rise and roll (of waves). Karón dalágkù ang mga balúd. Now there are heavy waves (white horses) on the sea. Nagabalúd ang dágat. The sea is rather rough,-is choppy. Nabádlan silá sa dágat. They had rough weather on the sea. (see bádlan, hanúl).


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