Search result(s) - sáid

balintúnod

Hiligaynon

To grasp, understand, comprehend, know. Walâ akó makabalintúnod sang íya nga hámbal. I could not understand what he said. (see hibaló, áto, sáyod, hántup, hangúp).



báng-og

Hiligaynon

Decomposition, putrefaction, rottenness: to decompose, putrify, rot, spoil, go bad so as to be unpalatable or unfit, said of food. Nagbáng-og ang kán-on. The rice spoiled. Nabáng-og ang íla punsyón, kay walâ magabút ang mga inágda. Their banquet got spoilt, because the invited guests did not put in an appearance. Nabang-ogán kamí sing isá ka búgsò nga kárne. One of our pieces of meat became putrid. Indì mo pagpabang-ogón ang ísdà. Don't allow the fish to go bad. (see bagéu, pán-os).


bángag

Hiligaynon

To crack, form fissures (said of the soil). Nagbángag ang ámon talámnan. Our field has cracks in it. Nabangagán ang humáy sa talámnan, kay dúgay na nga walâ magulán. There are cracks in the ground under the rice in the field, because it has not rained for a long time. Patubigán mo dáyon ang talámnan, agúd nga índì magbángag. Keep the field constantly under water or water the field constantly, lest it should form cracks. (see litík, balanâ, hirás).


bangág

Hiligaynon

Cracked, full of fissures, (said of the soil).


bángkong

Hiligaynon

Curved, bent, crooked, said especially of a carrier's pole; to be or make curved, to curve, bend. Hilókhilóka ang tuangtuangán túbtub nga magbángkong. Bend the carrier's pole till it stays curved. Ginbángkong níya ang íya tuangtuangán. He curved his carrying-pole. (see tikô, likô, balikô, balitók).


bankolitón

Hiligaynon

Pertaining to, or affected with, bankolít, said of rice-kernels with the bankolít, or part of it, still adhering to them, as often happens, unless the rice is pounded very thoroughly.


bará

Hiligaynon

(Sp. varar) To run aground, to run on sand in shallow water, be stranded (said of ships). Nagbará or nabará ang bapór. The steamer ran aground. Andamí ang ímo pagdalá sang sakayán, agúd índì magbará. Be careful in steering the boat, lest it should run aground. Dî mo pagpabarahón ang bapór. Don't run the boat aground. Figuratively: Nabará kamí kahápon sa igtubá. Yesterday we were stranded on the other side of the river.


baság

Hiligaynon

Hollow, dull, not resonant, cracked, said of sounds, as of a broken or cracked bell and the like; to emit a dull, hollow sound. Ang tunúg sang linggánay nga buúng baság. The sound of the broken bell is dull. Nagbaság ang tunúg sang linggánay, kay nabúung. The sound of the bell has become dull, for it is cracked. Nabasagán akó sang íya nga tíngug. His voice struck me as dull.


bát-ol

Hiligaynon

Having a large stone and little pulp, said of fruits like plums, lúmboy and the like; figuratively: dull, stupid, having little brains; to be or become dull, etc.


báw-og

Hiligaynon

Foul, rotten, stale, contaminated, fetid, putrid, polluted, said especially of water. Báw-og nga túbig. Foul water. Nagbáw-og ang túbig. The water has become fetid or polluted. (see alungaóg, báog).


bidhanán

Hiligaynon

Having plenty of roe or spawn, said of fish. (see bíhod).


binalighotán

Hiligaynon

Bound up in a knot, said particularly of a handkerchief or the like with knots for holding money or other small articles. Nadúlà ang íya pányo nga binalighotán sing tátlo ka mángmang. She lost her handkerchief with three pesos tied up in it. (see balighot, binugkósan, binugkosán).


bingít

Hiligaynon

Crying easily, cry-baby, peevish, cross, fretful, over-sensitive, emotional, especially said of children that fret and cry without apparent reason. (see ámog, pawíkan).


birá

Hiligaynon

(Sp. virar) To wind, turn, twist, open or close with some force, applied to screw-nuts, hinges, etc.; to tack, veer, wear, put about, said of ships. Birahá ang biságra nga kipót. Pry (prize) open the closed hinge. Ginbirá níla sang biradór ang ólo sang dirúskas nga dáan. They turned the screw-nut of the old screw with the monkey-wrench. Birahá ang láyag. Shift the sail. Birahá ang dawdáwan. Crank the engine (by hand). (see wárik, wálik, lúbag, likô).


bóg-oy

Hiligaynon

Well matched; to be well matched, have about equal advantages and disadvantages, said especially of wrestlers, boxers and the like. Nagabóg-oy ang mga nagadulúmug. The wrestlers are well matched.


borángkol

Hiligaynon

Loosely fitting and out of shape, misshapen, said of footwear; pieces of leather, etc. tied to the foot instead of boots; sandal. Borángkol kaáyo ang íya mga sapátos. His shoes are very ill-fitting.


bótbot

Hiligaynon

To draw or pull out; to pretend to extract an alleged splinter, stone, etc. from a person's body in superstitious practices. Ang babáylan, konó, nagbótbot sing bató, inágsap, biníklan, etc. sa batíis ni Fuláno. The wizard, it is said, took out a stone, chip, splinter, etc. from the calf of N.N.'s leg. Ginbotbotán or binotbotán sang babáylan ang masakít nga bátà sing tátlo ka bató. The wizard removed three stones from the sick boy's body.


buád-ad

Hiligaynon

To burst-, split-, open, said of rice, peas, beans, corn, etc., when cooked; also adjective; burst open. Nagbuád-ad ang balátong, mónggo, kán-on, etc. The beans, monggo, rice, etc. have burst whilst cooking. Buád-ad nga kán-on. Rice that bursts when cooked. (see butî, búsdik).


bugasón

Hiligaynon

Pertaining to rice, full of rice; pimpled or spotted as if with rice-kernels, especially said of diseased pork looking as if a great number of rice-kernels were imbedded in it. Indì akó makaúyon sang báboy nga bugasón. I do not like to eat spotted pork.


bugítbugít

Hiligaynon

To flow or trickle in small and frequent quantities, said of light rain, urine, diarrhoea, or the like. Nagabugítbugít ang kalibútan. It rains a little at frequent intervals. It is showery weather.


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11