Search result(s) - sako

sáko

Hiligaynon

Coat. (see amerikána).



sáko

Hiligaynon

(Sp. saco) Sack, bag. (see bayóong, máy-ong).


sákò

Hiligaynon

To be occupied, keep busy, to be busy; have much to do, give much work, be hard at work, hard at it. Nagasákò silá karón sang íla pagtánum. They are at present very busy planting rice. Masákò ang ákon trabáho. I have much work to do. Ginsákò níla ang pagpatíndog sang bág-o nga baláy, kay madalî na lang pagakáslon ang nóbyo kag nóbya. They have been working hard building the new house, for the bride and the bridegroom are soon to be married. Sakóa siá sang íya nga útang. Keep him busy with his debt i.e. remind him often of his debt, so that he may make an effort to pay it.


amerikána

Hiligaynon

(Sp. americana) A man's coat, American or European style. (see sáko).


ampílò

Hiligaynon

A coarse saddle-cloth, saddle-pad, often only an old sack or blanket used instead of a saddle by farmers riding on buffaloes, cows or horses; to use such a saddle-cloth. Nagaampílò siá sing sáko. He is using a sack as a saddle-cloth. Ampilói ang báka. Put a saddle-ploth on the back of the cow. Paampilói ang karabáw. Order someone to put a saddle-cloth on the buffalo. Iníng dáan nga hábul iampílò ko sa kabáyo. I will make use of this old blanket as a saddle-cloth for the horse. (see síya).


balúyot

Hiligaynon

Sack, bag, pouch, wallet. (see pálhuk, bayóong, púyo, sáko).


bát-al

Hiligaynon

To bulge, swell out, be stuffed full. Nagabát-al ang íya nga bólsa. His pocket bulges, is full. Guinpabát-al níya ang íya bólsa sang bukáka. He stuffed his pocket with ripe kamúnsel-fruit. Indì mo pagpabat-alón ang sáko sing támà, kay básì magísì. Don't cram the sack too much, for it might burst. (see báknal).


bátak

Hiligaynon

To pull upwards, to raise, lift, hoist, draw or pull aloft. Batáka ang bálde, ang bayóng, etc. Draw or pull up the pail, the bamboo water-container, etc. Batáki akó sing kawáyan. Pull up a bamboo for me. Ibátak akó ánay siníng sáko. Kindly lift this sack for me. Binatákan nía ang atóp sing sin. They hauled up to the roof some sheets of zinc. Batáki (pabatáki) ang bátà sang íya nga dungán, agúd magáyo. Raise (have raised) the child's tutelary ghost or genius, that it may get well. (This is a superstitious phrase).


busángsang

Hiligaynon

To be crammed, stuffed, tight, choke-full, chock-full; Also adjective: crammed, etc. Nagabusángsang ang sulúd sang bólsa mo. Your pockets are stuffed with things. Indì mo pagpabusangsangón ang bólsa mo, kay básì mabíkrat. Don't cram the pocket, for it may burst. Nabusangsangán ang sáko sang kamúnsil. The bag is crammed-, bursting with-, choke-full of-, chock-full of-, the fruit of the camunsel-tree. (see báknal, bát-al, gutúk).


búsdik

Hiligaynon

To split, burst open, applied to crammed sacks, stuffed pockets, too tight clothes, etc. Nabúsdik ang sáko. The sack burst open. Abáw, kabusúg ang ákon, daw sa mabúsdik ang tiyán ko. Why, I am so full, that my stomach feels like bursting. Sa lakás nga paghingamó mabúsdik ang sáko. Through too much greed the sack will burst open, i.e. too much greed leads to misery and poverty.


búslot

Hiligaynon

(H) Hole, aperture, opening, rent, gash, fissure, burst, tear. (see lubút, tohók, búhò; though these terms are used promiscuously for any kind of hole, still they do not properly mean the same thing. Tohók should be used for a hole made by a piercing instrument, búhò for holes in the ground, búslot and lubút for holes in floors, sacks, baskets, etc.) To make a hole, break a hole through something. Nabúslot ang tabíg, ang sáko, ang pinutús, etc. The rice-harvesting basket, the sack, the parcel, etc. has a hole in it, has had a hole broken through it.


dáhop

Hiligaynon

(B) To urge, occupy, keep busy, ply with work, give much to do. Dahópa ang táo sa pagóbra. Keep the man busy at work. Gindáhop níya akó sa pagarádo, sa pagbáyad sang ákon útang, etc. He urged me to plough vigorously, to pay my debt at once, etc. (see sákò).


dánghos

Hiligaynon

To be busy, have much to do, be much occupied, have one's hands full, have one's time taken up with. Ang mga táo karón nagadánghos sang tánum. People at present are busy planting rice. (see dúlup, sákò).


dúlup

Hiligaynon

(H) To be very busy-, occupied-, with, have no time, work hard at, be hard at work, be brisk, keep-moving,-on the move. Ginadulúpan níla ang atóp sang baláy. They are hard at work putting a roof on the house. Nagadúlup silá sang arádo. They are fully occupied with ploughing. Dulúpi ang ímo mga buluhatón. Be brisk in performing your duties. (see sákò, dánghos).


gáwhak

Hiligaynon

Hollow, hole, cavity, trace, said of what has been taken from a heap of rice, sand, corn or the like; to delve or dig into, scoop a hole in, make encroachments or inroads on a heap of ashes, flour, rice, etc. Nabúsdik ang sáko kag ang íya sulúd nga humáy nagáwhak. The sack burst open and a hollow was made in the rice it contained. Sín-o ang nagáwhak siníng túmpok nga humáy? Who encroached on this heap of rice? Who delved into this rice-heap? Huy, mga bátà, índì nínyo paggawhakán ang túmpok nga balás. Hello, you boys there, don't scoop holes in the sand-heap. Ginawhakán ni Fuláno iníng túmpok nga balás, kay íya kinuháan sing isá ka láta sa agás. N.N. dug into this sand-heap, for he took away an oilcanful. Gingawhakán sang makáwat ang ákon ápog. The thief made a hole in my lime. (see gáhuk, etc.).


gúhak

Hiligaynon

To burst open, split, crack. Nagúhak ang sáko kag nakagwá ang kóprak. The sack burst open and the copra fell out. (see búsdik).


himásang

Hiligaynon

A very busy time, the busy season of any undertaking; to be the busy season of (sugar-milling, rice-planting, etc.). Nagahimásang na gid karón ang tánum, áni, gáling, etc. This is now the busiest time of rice-planting, harvesting, sugar-milling, etc. (see sákò, dúlup).


híya

Hiligaynon

To be busy, occupied, have much to do. Nagahíya (nagahiníya) silá sang óbra, hámpang, sugál, etc. They are busy at work, at play, gambling, etc. (see sákò, dánghos, dúlup).


hohô

Hiligaynon

To shake empty, shake and pour out the contents of a sack or the like. Ihohô ang sáko. Shake out the contents of the sack. Hohoá ang kalámay sa bayóong. Pour the sugar out of the bag. Hohoí akó sing isá ka gántang nga humáy sa ság-ub. Pour me out one ganta of rice from the bamboo-receptacle. Ginhohó níya ang taón kag naggwâ ang mga katáng, uláng kag ísdà nga magamáy. He shook the small fish-trap and crabs, shrimps and small fish fell out.


hón-og

Hiligaynon

Wet, soaked, moist, impregnated, soggy, sodden; to wet, soak, etc., said especially of things liable to melt or dissolve. Ang asín, kalámay nagpahón-og sa sáko. The salt, sugar moistened the sack. Ang bayóong ginhon-ogán sang muskobádo. The bag was impregnated with muscovado (unrefined sugar). (see hún-og id.).


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