Meaning of e

e

Hiligaynon

The Visayan language has a vowel-sound that is neither that of Spanish "e" nor of Spanish "i", but occupies a position somewhere between the two. Consequently this sound is represented sometimes by "e" and sometimes by "i", even in spelling the same word, e.g. babáye, babáe, babáyi, babái; bebíngka, bibíngka; bígne, bígni, etc.

In choosing between the two vowels "i" has a better claim to recognition than "e", for the following reasons:-

1) The full open sound of "e" is never heard in Visayan, whereas "i" is often very clearly and sharply pronounced.

2) Whilst it is true that in many words the sound, of which we have spoken, is vague, yet as a rule it approaches "i" more nearly than "e".

The conclusion is that "i" can always be used, and that "e" might without loss be abolished from the Visayan Alphabet.

The following words under "e" are given, because, although they are of Spanish origin, yet they are frequently used in Visayan.



e

Hiligaynon

The Visayan language has a vowel-sound that is neither that of Spanish "e" nor of Spanish "i", but occupies a position somewhere between the two. Consequently this sound is represented sometimes by "e" and sometimes by "i", even in spelling the same word, e.g. babáye, babáe, babáyi, babái; bebíngka, bibíngka; bígne, bígni, etc.

In choosing between the two vowels "i" has a better claim to recognition than "e", for the following reasons:-

1) The full open sound of "e" is never heard in Visayan, whereas "i" is often very clearly and sharply pronounced.

2) Whilst it is true that in many words the sound, of which we have spoken, is vague, yet as a rule it approaches "i" more nearly than "e".

The conclusion is that "i" can always be used, and that "e" might without loss be abolished from the Visayan Alphabet.

The following words under "e" are given, because, although they are of Spanish origin, yet they are frequently used in Visayan.