Search result(s) - básbas

básbas

Hiligaynon

To cut, hew, trim, dress, chip wood to a shape or size required. Basbasí ang káhoy. Dress the wood. Ibásbas and dáldag sa káhoy. Trim the wood with the adze.



kórta

Hiligaynon

(Sp. cortar) To cut (clothes, etc.); to cut, chisel, fashion, carve (wood or stone); a fringe or indentation, cut in a zigzag or roundish pattern along the edge of a sleeve, etc., goffer, gauffer; to curdle, coagulate. Nagkórta ang gátas. The milk curdled. Nagkórta ang pásta, lúnang, etc. The paste, mud, etc. has become dry and friable. (see básbas, bórlas, bágtik, gréka).


lábra

Hiligaynon

(Sp. labrar) To strike, cut, hew down; dress, trim, carve, hew. Labrahí ang káhoy sang binángon. Trim or dress the wood with the bolo. Wásay ang ilábra mo sa káhoy nga pulukanón nga halilígyon. Use a hatchet to trim the tree that is to be cut down and made into a post. Ginlabrahán níya siá sang talibóng. He smote him with a large bolo. (see básbas, labô).


sápsap

Hiligaynon

To chip, cut, trim, dress wood, etc. Sapsapí ang halígi túbtub nga magpayósan. Dress or trim the post to a taper. Taper the post. (see básbas).


basbáson

Hiligaynon

Robust, vigorous, strong, able-bodied, active. Kalím-an na ka túig ang íya nga edád, ápang basbáson pa siá. He is fifty years old, but quite vigorous still Si Fuláno basbáson pa sa íya. N.N. is still more robust than he.


ásod

Hiligaynon

To strike in, add a hand to, to do something together with another in quick turns as one helping another to pound rice, workmen felling a tree or trimming wood by alternate blows, etc. Asod without any other qualification mostly means: to help another pound rice by alternate blows of the pestles. Asdi (asódi) si mánang mo. Help your elder sister to pound rice. Asdi si mánong mo sa pagtapás sang káhoy. Help your elder brother to fell the tree (by giving alternate strokes of the axe, now on this side, now on the other side of the tree). Ang pagásod sa pagkánta maláin, sa pagbásbas kag pagbayó maáyo. To strike in after another in singing (out of unison) is bad, but for dressing timber or pounding rice it is the proper or right thing to do. Ginásdan níla nga duhá sang ákig si Fuláno. They, both of them together, vented their anger on N.N.