Search result(s) - sáwsaw

sáwsaw

Hiligaynon

To go or step into water, mud, etc.; to dip or soak in. Nakasáwsaw akó sa lúnang (lalaó). I stepped into the mud. Indì ka magsáwsaw sang ímo kamót sa túbig. Don't dip your hand into the water. Isáwsaw mo ang tinápay sa sabáw. Dip the bread into the sauce. Ginsawsawán níla ang bíno sing mamón. They soaked some cakes in wine. (see sagáwsaw).



panagáwsaw

Hiligaynon

Freq. of sagáwsaw-to dip in, step into mud, etc. (see sáwsaw, panáwsaw).


panaláwsaw

Hiligaynon

To soak, drench, immerse, dip, plunge, put into a liquid; put to the test, examine, investigate; examination, investigation. Iníng mga butáng dápat nga usisáon sa isá ka dayág nga panaláwsaw. This matter should be investigated by a public hearing-or-in open trial. Nakapanagámsam kag nakapanaláwsaw siá sang maluíb nga pamatásan sang kalibútan. She has tasted and experienced the treacherous ways of the world. (see sáwsaw).


panáwsaw

Hiligaynon

Freq. of sáwsaw-to dip in, soak in; to fathom, examine.


sagáwsaw

Hiligaynon

To walk or step into something; to try, investigate, examine, go deep into a matter, to sound. Sagawsawá kon saráng kaw makahurám ti (kang) kwárta na. (Sagawsawá (Tilawí) kon saráng ka makahulám sang íya kwárta). Sound him as to whether you can borrow-his money,-money from him (of him). (see sáwsaw, tiláw, túdag, usísà).


w

Hiligaynon

As this letter does not belong to the Spanish Alphabet it does not occur in Visayan literature previous to the American Occupation; "o" and "u" were generally used in its place. At the beginning of a syllable its correct pronunciation is almost identical with (or just a shade softer than) the "w" in English words as "wag, well, will, woe, would, etc.". At the end of a syllable after "a" it forms the diphtong "aw" (e.g. daw, táwtaw, sáwsaw, línaw) that is nearly equivalent to the English "ou" in "out, about, loud, etc.". At the end of a syllable after "e" or "i" its correct pronunciation is quite peculiar and can be learned only by hearing, e.g. bagéw, baréw, siríw, téwbew, etc. It is to be remarked that many Visayan words ending in "o" or "u" lose these vowels in some verbal forms and in terms derived from them and take the letter "w" instead, e.g. báywon, saláywan, gámwan, sápwan, kaburúywan, etc. (from bayó, salayó, gamó, sapó, buyó, etc.).