Search result(s) - áy-ay

áy-ay

Hiligaynon

To spread out before, show, display. Ginayayán níya akó sang íya bág-o nga huégo. She showed me her new dress. (see ládlad).



áy

Hiligaynon

An exclamation of surprise, joy, sorrow, or pain. Ah! Oh! Aye!


hámyang

Hiligaynon

Exposed, in full sight or view, laid out; to be laid out, be exposed to view. Hámyang na sa lamésa ang mga pagkáon. The eatables have been placed on the table,-are spread on the table. Ipahámyang mo ang pagkáon sa látok. Put the food on the table. Nagahámyang siá dirâ sa salúg. He lies there on the floor in full view of everybody. (see kúyang, butáng, áy-ay).


kaasoyán

Hiligaynon

Use, usefulness, avail. Walâ sing (Waáy, wa'áy) kaasoyán. No use, good for nothing, of no avail. (see ásoy, átsoy).


ládlad

Hiligaynon

To open, spread out, extend, lay (a carpet, table-cloth, etc.), hold out or show to; cast (a net). Iládlad ang sápyaw. Cast the fishing net. Ladladá (-ará) ang amákan. Spread the bamboo mat. Ladladí akó sing baníg. Spread a sleeping mat for me. Iládlad ang mga siód sa talúnan. Spread the traps over the forest. (see bulád, húmlad, áy-ay).


luáy, lu-áy

Hiligaynon

Awry, bent, inclined to one side; to be awry, etc. Nagaluáy ang íya báyò, kamisón, etc. Her upper garment, her shirt, etc. is all awry or hanging down on one side (exposing part of the shoulder). Indì mo pagpaluayón ang kimóno mo. Don't wear your waist awry or twisted to one side (thereby displaying too much of the skin on one side of the neck).


saliáy, sali-áy

Hiligaynon

To lean upon, rest one's back upon-, against-, something. Nagasali-áy siá sa mga ulúnan ukón sa butáka man kon ginaabút siá sang íya balatían nga hápò. He rests his back upon the pillows or against the back of a chair, whenever he suffers from asthma. (see sándig).


sáma

Hiligaynon

Equal, peer, compeer, match; to equalize, smooth out, be or make equal, level, even, smooth. Wa'áy sáma. Without peer, unequaled, unsurpassed, peerless, unrivalled. Nasáma (nagkasáma, nagkasaláma) silá nga tanán. They were all equal,-became all equal, level, etc. (see saláma).


sanglítan

Hiligaynon

Example, etc. See sánglit. Wa'áy sanglítan (sánglit). Without example, i.e. unique, unsurpassed, without a peer, unrivalled, peerless, supreme, consummate, exceeding (above) all standards. (see pananglítan).


waáy, wa'áy

Hiligaynon

For walâ sing-there is none, etc. Waáy akó kwárta. I have no money. Waáy síngsing dirí. There is no ring here. Waáy táo sa baláy. Nobody is at home. There is no one in the house. Wa'áy sáma (sánglit, súbung, ikaduhá, ángay, etc.). There is no equal (peer, compeer, second, comparable to, etc.). It is unexampled, peerless, unprecedented, unparalleled, extraordinary, incomparable, matchless, or the like.


waláy, walá'y

Hiligaynon

(H) For walâ sing. Walá'y sapayán--. Notwithstanding, nevertheless, though, although, in spite of--. Waláy pulús. No good. Useless. Of no use. Waláy táo sa baláy. There is nobody at home. (see wa'áy, waáy, wáy, warát, warâ, ti).


wáy

Hiligaynon

Contr. of waáy, wa'áy equivalent to walâ sing. Wáy kapuslánan inâ. That is of no use. That is no good. Wáy sáyod inâ. That's nonsense.


agáy-ay

Hiligaynon

Decomposition, rottenness, decay, blight, produced by the action of small worms, vermin, insects, parasites (both vegetable and animal), the decayed parts frequently being turned into powder. Also used as a verb. May agáy-ay or ginaagáy-ay ang káhoy, bugás, tápì, salúg, etc. The wood-, rice-, board-, floor-, is worm-eaten. Igátong na lang ang inagáy-ay nga káhoy. Use the worm-eaten timber for firewood. Ang kadiós inagay-ayán na man. The black peas have also become infested with blight.


aláy-ay

Hiligaynon

To carry in-, support with-, one's arms, a child, sick person or the like, the person carried or supported assuming a leaning or half-lying position. Ginaaláy-ay níya ang masakít níya nga ilóy. She supports with her arms her sick mother. Alay-ayá ang bátà. Carry the baby in your arms. Ialáy-ay akó ánay siníng pilasón. Kindly support this wounded man with your arms. Paaláy-ayá siá sang masakit. Let him support the sick person.


sál-ay

Hiligaynon

To put one's arms under another's back, let another recline on one's arms, to support or carry in the arms (putting one arm under a person's back and one under the knees, as is often done in taking up a sleeping baby, lifting a sick person, a corpse, or the like). Ginsál-ay ni María Santísima ang bángkay sang Aton Ginóo. The Blessed Virgin Mary supported the dead body of Our Lord. Sal-ayá ang masakít nga táo. Put your arms under the sick man's back (and lift him up). Sinál-ay níya sing mahínay ang bátà nga nagakatulúg. She gently lifted the sleeping child. (see aláy-ay, hamíl-ay).