Search result(s) - aláp-ap

aláp-ap

Hiligaynon

White spots on the skin, especially on the arms and legs. May aláp-ap ang íya bútkon. His arm has white spots on it. Inalap-apán ang íya batíis. His calf is covered with white spots.



áb-ab

Hiligaynon

To eat or bite off a piece: to undermine and carry off, wash away (of water). Ab-abá lang ang tinápay kag ang mabilin nga inab-abán ihátag mo sa ímo mánghud. Just bite off a piece of bread, and give the remainder to your younger brother (sister). May katalágman nga ab-abón sang subâ ang pángpang. There is danger that the river will undermine and carry off its banks. Indì mo pag-ipaáb-ab[*] ang kárne sa idô. Do not let the dog snap at the meat. (see áp-ap, kábkab, kádkad, ríbrib).


áklab

Hiligaynon

To bite, snap, tear with the teeth. (see kagát, úkub, tukúb, áp-ap).


álap

Hiligaynon

The last cleaning of rice before it is washed and got ready for the kettle; to clean rice after the two siftings called "tahúp" and "sisíg" respectively. Alápi ang bugás. Clean the rice. Separate from the rice all admixtures (that should not be boiled together with the clean, properly hulled rice). Iálap akó ánay sináng bugás. Please clean that rice for me. Ipaálap ang bugás sa bátà. Get the servant to clean the rice. Walâ siá sing inalápan. He has no clean rice.


aláp-álap

Hiligaynon

Freq. of álap. The phrase "Walâ siá sing aláp-alápan" means: "He is so busy that he is unable to cope with the work". Literally: he has no clean rice in the house (being unable to attend to that on account of having much other work).


aláp-apón

Hiligaynon

Pertaining to aláp-ap; one who has white spots on his skin. (see aláp-ap).


ángkab

Hiligaynon

A snap, bite; to snap, bite, seize suddenly with the teeth. Ginángkab siá sang idô. He was bitten by the dog. Angkabá siá. Snap him. Angkabí lang sing diótay iníng páhò. Just take a bite of this mango. Hípus ka, kay kon dílì ipaángkab ko ikáw sa ákon idô. Be silent, otherwise I'll get my dog to bite you. (see ikíb, ínkib, kíbkib, kítkit, áb-ab, áp-ap, ót-ot).


áp-ap

Hiligaynon

To bite off a piece, to eat by snaps and snatches, to devour fruit greedily without taking the trouble of peeling it beforehand, etc. Ap-apá lang ang páhò páti bákal. Just devour the mango together with its stone by biting off a small bit at a time. Ap-apí sing diótay ang tinápay. Take a small bite out of the bread. Indì ka magáp-ap (mangáp-ap) sang ímo ginakáon súbung sang isá ka idô. Don't snap at your food like a dog. (see áb-ab, ikíb, ínkib, kíbkib, etc.).



íngkib

Hiligaynon

To nibble, gnaw, bite off a little at a time. Nagaíngkib siá sing maís nga binóog. He is nibbling roasted corn, popcorn. Ingkibí lang ang maís. Just nibble the corn (on the cob). (see ikíb, kíbkib, kítkit, ót-ot, áp-ap).


íngkib

Hiligaynon

To nibble, gnaw, bite off a little at a time. Nagaíngkib siá sing maís nga binóog. He is nibbling roasted corn, popcorn. Ingkibí lang ang maís. Just nibble the corn (on the cob). (see ikíb, kíbkib, kítkit, ót-ot, áp-ap).


páng-it

Hiligaynon

To gnaw, nibble, bite off piece by piece. (see kíbkib, kítkit, áp-ap, áb-ab, páng-os, háng-it).


panúk-ap

Hiligaynon

Freq. of tók-ap-to brush-, knock-, flick-, off (with a towel, handkerchief, etc.).


tók-ap

Hiligaynon

To shake swiftly in the air; to strike, flick, knock, wipe, brush something off with a towel or the like. Itók-ap ang pányò nga punô (butâ) sang yáb-ok. Shake the handkerchief that is full of dust. Tok-apí sang pányò mo ang lamésa, kay madámù ang yáb-ok. Wipe the table with your handkerchief, for it is covered with dust.


túsop

Hiligaynon

To bite off a piece, eat by snaps and snatches, gnaw, nibble, pick (a bone, etc.). (see áp-ap, kíbkib, kítkit).


uráb

Hiligaynon

(B) To gnaw, nibble, bite, eat (much fruit, etc.). Warâ (tána) ti gána magkáon (kang kán-on), hay nagsári kang uráb kang samlági. (Walâ siá sing gána magkáon (sang kán-on), kay nagságad sang káon sang sámbag). He does not want to take food (rice, dinner)-, He has spoilt his appetite-, because he has eaten (has been gnawing, nibbling) too much tamarind-fruit (too many tamarinds). (see áp-ap, háng-it, káon, kíbkib, kítkit).


uráb

Hiligaynon

(B) To gnaw, nibble, bite, eat (much fruit, etc.). Warâ (tána) ti gána magkáon (kang kán-on), hay nagsári kang uráb kang samlági. (Walâ siá sing gána magkáon (sang kán-on), kay nagságad sang káon sang sámbag). He does not want to take food (rice, dinner)-, He has spoilt his appetite-, because he has eaten (has been gnawing, nibbling) too much tamarind-fruit (too many tamarinds). (see áp-ap, háng-it, káon, kíbkib, kítkit).


wás-ag

Hiligaynon

To scatter, spread; to undo, unmake, demolish, destroy, break in pieces; to disintegrate, fall out or off and spread in all directions, as grain escaping through a hole in a sack, or the like. Ginwás-ag sang hángin ang mga dáhon nga layâ sang káhoy. The wind scattered the dead (dry) leaves of the tree. Kon itók-ap mo ang sáko ang íya sulúd inawás-ag. If you shake the sack its contents will fall out. (see wágwag, busáag, lápta, aláplag, sábud, gubâ, ránggà, etc.)