Search result(s) - áka

áka

Hiligaynon

To sell well, be much in demand, be much sought after. Nagáka karón sa Ilongílong ang páhò, ságing, ísdà kag manók. At present mangoes, bananas, fish and chickens are much in demand in Iloilo. Sang túig nga tinalíkdan maíwat ang pamaligyáon sang sibúkaw, ápang nián nagáka na. Last year the market for sibúkaw-wood was dull, stagnant, but now it is much in demand. (see maáka, kaáka, mabákal, bákal, ágaw, dásà).



abaká

Hiligaynon

(Sp. abaca) The hemp-plant; hemp-fibre; hempen, made of hemp. Panápton nga abaká, kalát nga abaká, etc. Hemp-cloth, hemp-rope, etc. (see lánot).


abakahán

Hiligaynon

One who has plenty of-, is rich in-, hemp; containing hemp-plants, suitable for a hemp-plantation. Bakólod nga abakahán. A hill covered with hemp-plants or suitable for growing hemp. Bankílan siá, kay abakahán kaáyo. He is wealthy or influential, because he owns large hemp-plantations.


abákan

Hiligaynon

A small fish of a reddish colour.


akál-akál

Hiligaynon

To bubble, to seethe; to throb. Nagabukál na ang túbig, kay nagaakál-akál na. The water is boiling now, for it is bubbling. Nagaakál-akál ang tutúnlan ko. My throat throbs. Indì mo pagbak-itón ang tsaréra, kóndì paakál-akalá ánay ang túbig sing maáyo. Don't take the tea-kettle off the fire, but let the water first boil properly.


akáso

Hiligaynon

(Sp. acaso) Chance, coincidence, casualty; by chance, perchance, perhaps, maybe, mayhap, possibly. (see básì, áyhan, dámlag).


akásya

Hiligaynon

(Sp. acacia) Acacia-tree.


akáy

Hiligaynon

(B) Darling. A term of endearment used towards small girls, sweethearts, daughters, daughters-in-law and other near female relations. Diín si akáy? Where is darling? Ihátag iní sa kay akáy. Give this to darling. (see índay, gíngging, néna, nénè, néning, púngpung; the corresponding masculine terms are nónoy, tótò, tútò).


alaká-ak

Hiligaynon

Spread, distributed, dispersed over a large area with considerable distances between; to be spread or distributed, etc. Alaká-ak or nagaalaká-ak ang mga háyop sa latagón, ang mga gál-um sa lángit, etc. The cattle are scattered over the open country, the clouds are distributed over the sky, etc. Alaká-ak gid lámang ang mga baláy dídto sa bakólod. The houses there on the hill are widely spaced. (see aták-aták).


alakápa

Hiligaynon

(Sp. a la capa) For appearance only, for politeness' sake, coldly formal, not heartily or sincerely. Gin-*ágda man akó níya, hóo, ápang alakápa lang. He invited me also, yes, but only to keep up appearances. Nagtámbong man siá, ápang alakápa lang, dílì hutúhut. He put in an appearance too, but in a coldly formal way, not with right goodwill. (see pasamústra, pakuláhaw id.).


alakáyo

Hiligaynon

Buffoon, jester, merry-andrew, clown; to act the clown, crack jokes, converse wittily, utter pleasantries. Ginalakayóhan akó níya. He made me laugh with his pleasantries or he acted like a clown in my presence. (see bilyáko, payáso, társo, páskin).


alibákaw

Hiligaynon

The quite ripe betelnut that is preferred for chewing. Malúyag akó magmamâ sang alibákaw. I like to chew ripe betelnuts.


alpáka

Hiligaynon

(Sp. alpaca) Alpaca, the animal as well as the thin, light fabrics made from its soft, silky wool.


alugakâ

Hiligaynon

Loose, slack, not tight, not well secured. (see halugakâ, halúg, halugâ, hugák, talungkakâ).


amákan

Hiligaynon

Bamboo matting used for drying rice, copra, etc. in the sun. Also for partition walls, ceilings, floor-carpets, etc.


atakádo

Hiligaynon

(Sp. atacado) Attacked, assailed, assaulted (by robbers, etc.); infected (by disease, etc.). (see dúnggò, dinúnggò, aránka, soróso, inaránka, sinoróso).


atakár

Hiligaynon

(Sp. atacar) To attack, fall upon, assail, assault, be aggressive, to affect, infect. Ginatakár akó sang mga buyóng, sang balaód, etc. I was attacked by the robbers, by dysentery, etc.


atráka

Hiligaynon

(Sp. atracar) To approach, overtake; overcome, lay low, break down. Walâ silá makaatráka sang amó nga talútug. They could not break down that palisade. Atrakáha siá. Lay him low. Knock him down.


ayopáka

Hiligaynon

(B) Very childish, silly, foolish, out of one's wits, senile, particularly applied to old people in their second childhood. (see tsótso, alogadí, ulianón, urumánon, payaón).


bagákay

Hiligaynon

A kind of very light bamboo, smaller even than that called bóloò.


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