Search result(s) - índay

índay

Hiligaynon

Darling girl, sweetheart, dear child, little dear, little girl. (see akáy, bábay).



indáy

Hiligaynon

The vocative of índay. Darling, dear, my sweet, honey.


índay

Hiligaynon

Darling girl, sweetheart, dear child, little dear, little girl. (see akáy, bábay).


indáy

Hiligaynon

The vocative of índay. Darling, dear, my sweet, honey.


akáy

Hiligaynon

(B) Darling. A term of endearment used towards small girls, sweethearts, daughters, daughters-in-law and other near female relations. Diín si akáy? Where is darling? Ihátag iní sa kay akáy. Give this to darling. (see índay, gíngging, néna, nénè, néning, púngpung; the corresponding masculine terms are nónoy, tótò, tútò).


Dim. of búgà. Like white sandstone: full of such sandstone. Inday, batóna akó, kay malápad ang ákon dútà; bisán bugâbugâ, ápang kargádo sa pasákà. Sweetheart, accept me, for my lands are extensive; they may be full of white sandstone, but they are watered by irrigation.


gíngging

Hiligaynon

A darling (female). (see akáy, índay, néna, néning, bábay).


malí-máli

Hiligaynon

Dim. and Freq. of malí. Also: to insinuate, hint at, use indirect language, enlighten another's mind by allusions, speak in parables, often practised by one who wishes to obtain a favour from another or to come to an agreement, to throw out a "polite hint" in a round-about way. Ginmalímalíhan níya kamí nga ang íya nónoy buút mangasáwa sa ámon índay. He politely insinuated that his son wants to marry our daughter. Malímalíha ang paghámbal mo sa íla. Talk to them with polite insinuations or allusions. Nagamalímáli silá nga buút magsímpon sa ámon sang íla anák. They are insinuating their desire or wish of having their boy stay with us. Masúnsun ang hámbal sang Aton Ginúo malímáli. Our Lord often spoke in parables.


néna

Hiligaynon

(Sp. nena) A girl infant, darling, baby, girl (as a term of endearment). (see akáy, índay, néning).


néning

Hiligaynon

See néna, akáy, índay, as terms of endearment for young girls.


púngpung

Hiligaynon

Darling. (see akáy, índay, bábay).


lamínday

Hiligaynon

Slow, weak, feeble; to do slowly, etc. Lamínday ang íya paglakát, pangabúdlay, etc. He walks, works, etc. slowly. Nagalamínday siá sa pagkáon-or-lamínday siá sing pangáon. He is a slow eater. Naglamínday ang karabáw, kay nabúdlay. The buffalo is slow, for it is tired. (see ágday, búndul, pákok, hínay, lágday, etc.).


tínday

Hiligaynon

The young of large domestic animals, as the calf of a cow, the foal of a mare, the lamb of an ewe, the kid of a goat (but not of pigs or dogs). (see totóy-a young dog; orók, idík-a young pig).


ágday

Hiligaynon

Slowness, weakness, laziness; to do slowly,-leisurely,-lazily, to be slow at work, dilatory in execution, dull of understanding. Anó ang ginaágday mo? Why do you work so slowly? Indì ka magágday sa pagóbra or indì mo pagagdáyon ang pagóbra. Don't be lazy at work. (see hínay, lágway, lágday, lamínday, luyò, búndol, pákok).


ánggot

Hiligaynon

To get used to take proper food, to get a liking for, or to relish, proper food, applied especially to a baby or to a young animal just weaned. Sang úna iníng tínday nagdolodámgot (nagdolodánggot) lang sang hilamón, ápang karón nagánggot na sa halálbon. Formerly this calf used only to nibble at the grass, but now it is beginning to graze. Bisán lutasón na iníng bátà, kay maánggot na sa pagkáon sing kán-on. There is no harm now in weaning this baby, because it already likes to eat rice.


báka

Hiligaynon

(Sp. vaca) Cow, ox, cattle. Báka nga gatasán. A milch cow. (see tóro-bull, steer; tínday-calf).


bálio

Hiligaynon

(B) To barter, exchange, swap, swop. Ginbaliohán ko ang ákon karabáw sang isá ka báka. I exchanged my buffalo for a cow. Baliohán ko ang ákon kálò sang ímo líbro or Ibálio ko ang ákon kálò sa ímo líbro. I will exchange my hat for your book. Ginbálio níya ang íya báboy sa ákon tínday. He swapped his pig for my calf. (see báilo, báylo, bályo).


dámgot

Hiligaynon

To begin to eat or graze, start taking other food than milk, said of a baby and of a young animal. Nagadámgot na ang bátà, tínday. The baby, the calf, is now commencing to take other food than milk. (see lánggot).


dáyà

Hiligaynon

Trick, cheat, wile, cheating, trickery, fraud; to cheat, trick, do, diddle, take in, defraud, overreach, swindle, impose-, practise-, play-, put-, palm-, foist-, upon. Nagdáyà siá sa ákon or gindayáan níya akó. He cheated me. He defrauded me. He played a trick on me. Ginaanó mo pagdáyà (Anó ang ginadáyà mo)? What tricks are you up to? (see dasiâ, limbong).


dáyaw

Hiligaynon

To praise, exalt, extol, esteem, appreciate, magnify, glorify, make much of, speak well of, honour, admire, laud, think or speak highly of. Dayáwon ang Diós. Praised be God. Blessed be God. Ginadáyaw níla ang bág-o nga simbáhan. They are full of praise for the new church. Dayáwa siá, kay dalayáwon. Honour him, for he is worthy of honour. Gindáyaw ko siá, kay nakasáyod akó nga dalayawón siá, kag iniháwan akó níya sing manók kag ginpainúm sing tubâ. I flattered him, because I knew that flattery goes down with him, and he killed a chicken for me and gave me some toddy to drink. Idáyaw sa íya ang íya bág-o nga baláy, ang íya kaálam, etc. Speak well of his new house, of his learning, etc. Gindáyaw níla siá tungúd sang madámù níya nga pagkasampáton. They exalted him on account of his many accomplishments. (see padungúg).


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