Search result(s) - bayí

bayí

Hiligaynon

Grandmother. (see úyang, úlang, úway, lóla, abuéla, lakí-grandfather).



abuéla

Hiligaynon

(Sp. abuela) Grandmother. (see úlang, úyang, úway, bayí).


imáy

Hiligaynon

Grandmother; ancestor, granny, grannie. (see bayí, úyang, úway).


imáy

Hiligaynon

Grandmother; ancestor, granny, grannie. (see bayí, úyang, úway).


lakí

Hiligaynon

Grandfather. (see úlang, úyong, abuélo, lólo, bayí-grandmother).


lóla

Hiligaynon

(Sp. lola) Grandmother. (see úyang, úlang, bayí, abuéla).


óway

Hiligaynon

Grandmother, grandma, granny, granddam. (see úyang, bayí, imáy, úlang, lóla, abuéla).


óway

Hiligaynon

Grandmother, grandma, granny, granddam. (see úyang, bayí, imáy, úlang, lóla, abuéla).


úlang

Hiligaynon

Grandfather, grandmother. (see úyang, úyong, bayí, lakí, etc.).


úlang

Hiligaynon

Grandfather, grandmother. (see úyang, úyong, bayí, lakí, etc.).


úyang

Hiligaynon

Grandmother. (see úlang, bayí, úway).


úyang

Hiligaynon

Grandmother. (see úlang, bayí, úway).


úyong

Hiligaynon

Grandfather. (see úlang, lakí, úyang, imáy, bayí-grandmother).


úyong

Hiligaynon

Grandfather. (see úlang, lakí, úyang, imáy, bayí-grandmother).


ágbay

Hiligaynon

To put one's arms on or round another's shoulder. Nagalakát silá nga nagaagbayánay. They are walking with their arms round each other's shoulders. Agbayí siá. Place your arm on his shoulder. Indì ka magágbay sa íya. Don't put your arm on his or her shoulder. Paagbayón mo ang masakít. Let the sick person put his arm on your shoulder. Sa dakû nga kakáhas nagágbay siá sa kay Fulána, apang dáyon siá níya sinúmbag kag siníkway. With great boldness he put his arm on Miss N.N.'s shoulder, but immediately he received a slap from her and was repulsed with contempt.


alobáybay

Hiligaynon

Handrail, railing to hold oneself by, balustrade. Also used as a verb. Alobaybayí ang hágdan sang ímo baláy. Make a handrail for the ladder leading up to your house. Iníng hágdan walâ sing alobáybay. This ladder has no handrail. Naalobaybayán ang íla nga pántaw. Their kitchen balcony is surrounded by a balustrade. Mangalobáy-bay kamó kon manáug. Keep your hand on the handrail when you go down-stairs. Nagapangalobáybay na ang bátà. The baby is already learning to walk or making its first steps by keeping itself up or supporting itself by holding on to a chair, a wall, etc. (see gabáy, gabayán).


atábay

Hiligaynon

Shoring, shoring material, temporary props, supports, lining; to shore up, to line, to prop, support temporarily. Atabáyi ang bubón. Line the water-hole. Iatábay ko iníng pánit sang burí sa áwang námon. I will use this bark of the buri-palm to line our well with. Atabáyon ko ang pánit siníng burí. I will make shoring or lining of the bark of this buri-palm.


e

Hiligaynon

The Visayan language has a vowel-sound that is neither that of Spanish "e" nor of Spanish "i", but occupies a position somewhere between the two. Consequently this sound is represented sometimes by "e" and sometimes by "i", even in spelling the same word, e.g. babáye, babáe, babáyi, babái; bebíngka, bibíngka; bígne, bígni, etc.

In choosing between the two vowels "i" has a better claim to recognition than "e", for the following reasons:-

1) The full open sound of "e" is never heard in Visayan, whereas "i" is often very clearly and sharply pronounced.

2) Whilst it is true that in many words the sound, of which we have spoken, is vague, yet as a rule it approaches "i" more nearly than "e".

The conclusion is that "i" can always be used, and that "e" might without loss be abolished from the Visayan Alphabet.

The following words under "e" are given, because, although they are of Spanish origin, yet they are frequently used in Visayan.


e

Hiligaynon

The Visayan language has a vowel-sound that is neither that of Spanish "e" nor of Spanish "i", but occupies a position somewhere between the two. Consequently this sound is represented sometimes by "e" and sometimes by "i", even in spelling the same word, e.g. babáye, babáe, babáyi, babái; bebíngka, bibíngka; bígne, bígni, etc.

In choosing between the two vowels "i" has a better claim to recognition than "e", for the following reasons:-

1) The full open sound of "e" is never heard in Visayan, whereas "i" is often very clearly and sharply pronounced.

2) Whilst it is true that in many words the sound, of which we have spoken, is vague, yet as a rule it approaches "i" more nearly than "e".

The conclusion is that "i" can always be used, and that "e" might without loss be abolished from the Visayan Alphabet.

The following words under "e" are given, because, although they are of Spanish origin, yet they are frequently used in Visayan.


gabáy

Hiligaynon

To hold on to, cling to, clutch, grip, grasp, fasten upon, seize-, get-, lay-, take-, catch-, lay fast-, take firm-, hold of, keep oneself up by. Ginabayán níya ang kawáyan. He took hold of the bamboo. Gabayí ang kawáyan, agúd índì ka malumús. Keep yourself up by the bamboo, lest you drown. Gabayán mo sing maáyo ang alobaybayán, agúd índì ka mahúlug sa hágdan. Grasp the handrail well, lest you should fall down the ladder. Gabáy ka sa káhoy nga nagalutáw, agúd índì ka malumús. Cling to the floating piece of wood, lest you should drown. (see kapút, kápyot, úyat).


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