Search result(s) - mánang

mánang

Hiligaynon

The eldest sister. Si mánang mo diín? Diín si mánang mo? Where is your eldest sister. (see mánong-eldest brother).



manáng

Hiligaynon

The vocative of mánang.


ásod

Hiligaynon

To strike in, add a hand to, to do something together with another in quick turns as one helping another to pound rice, workmen felling a tree or trimming wood by alternate blows, etc. Asod without any other qualification mostly means: to help another pound rice by alternate blows of the pestles. Asdi (asódi) si mánang mo. Help your elder sister to pound rice. Asdi si mánong mo sa pagtapás sang káhoy. Help your elder brother to fell the tree (by giving alternate strokes of the axe, now on this side, now on the other side of the tree). Ang pagásod sa pagkánta maláin, sa pagbásbas kag pagbayó maáyo. To strike in after another in singing (out of unison) is bad, but for dressing timber or pounding rice it is the proper or right thing to do. Ginásdan níla nga duhá sang ákig si Fuláno. They, both of them together, vented their anger on N.N.


labúd

Hiligaynon

Weal, wale, mark (of a whip or the like); a streak, stripe (of two threads or fibres); to streak, stripe, mark with stripes. Ilabúd sa kabáyo ang látigo. Labudí (-urí) ang kabáyo sang látigo. Give the horse the whip. May labúd ang íya nga písngi. There is a weal on his cheek. Búnal nga waáy labúd. A whipping without weals, i.e. a severe scolding, adverse criticism, etc. Ang sámay sang ákon patádyong isá gid lang ka labúd nga sedalína, ápang ang íya sang patádyong ni mánang duhá gid ka púlò ka labúd nga sedalína. The stripes in my skirt consist of only two silk threads, but those in the skirt of my eldest sister consist of forty silk threads. Butangí ang ákon báyò sing duhá ka labúd nga mapulá. Put two red stripes into my jacket. (see lábhag, lábtik, sámay, guráy).


manáy

Hiligaynon

(H) Familiarly used for mánang-eldest sister.


mánong

Hiligaynon

The eldest brother. (see mánang-the eldest sister).


mananggíti

Hiligaynon

Toddy-gatherer, tubâ-collector, one whose daily business is to climb a number of coconut palms and to collect the palm-wine. (see tubéro-a seller of, dealer in, tubá).


bahág

Hiligaynon

A loin cloth; to wear only a loin-cloth. Indì ka magbahág, kóndì magpuróy ka gid. Don't go out in a loin-cloth, but wear at least short breeches. Bahagá lang yanáng hénero. Simply use that cloth as a cover for your loins. Pabahagí siá. Have a loin-cloth put on him. Provide him with a loin-cloth. Ang mga mananggéte nagabahág. Tuba-gatherers wear loin-cloths.


dawatán

Hiligaynon

A receptacle, especially the bamboo receptacle used in the collection of toddy from the coconut palms. Ang sulúd sang salúd ginawaní sang mananggéte sa íya nga dawatán. The palm-wine collector empties the contents of the vessel attached to the fruit-stalk of the coconut palm into his collecting-receptacle. (see kawít, pasók).


palatík

Hiligaynon

(H) A beater, hammer, knocker, stick, anything to strike a gong with, beat a drum with, or the like. Palatík sang bómbo. Drum-stick. Palatík sang mananggíti. The piece of split bamboo used by toddy-gatherers for scraping clean their toddy-receptacles. (After the cleaning of the "salúd" the "palatík" is struck several times against the coconut palm in order to rid it of the adhering dregs; hence the name). (see patík).


panánggot

Hiligaynon

Freq. of sánggot. To use-, apply-, a "sánggot"; to be a-toddy-gatherer,-toddy-collector,-mananggíti.


tubéro

Hiligaynon

(From tubâ and the Sp. suffix -ero) A seller or vender of-, a dealer in-, palmwine (toddy). (see mananggíti-a collector or gatherer of palmwine).