Search result(s) - kán-on

kán-on

Hiligaynon

Food, especially cooked rice. (see káon).



palakán-on

Hiligaynon

(H) What is to be fed, a person as a consumer of food; one who is dependent on another for his support. Madámù siá sing mga palakán-on sa íya baláy. He has many mouths at home to feed. Palakán-on níya siá. He is supported by him. He is a dependent of his. (see káon, pakáon).


ád-ad

Hiligaynon

To reject food, slobber, slubber, drivel, slaver, let food slowly flow from the mouth (as babies often do). Indì mo pagadadón ang kán-on. Do not slobber your food. Indì mo pagadadón ang ságing. Don't slobber and spit out, the banana.


agóp-op

Hiligaynon

Mouldiness, mustiness, mould. Also used as a verb. Iníng tinápay may agóp-op or ginaagóp-op. This bread is mouldy. Indì akó kaúyon sang tinápay nga inagóp-op or inagop-opán. I do not like to eat musty or mouldy bread. Indì mo pagpaagóp-opón ang tinápay, kán-on, dólse, etc. Do not let the bread, rice, sweetmeats, etc. become mildewed or musty.


angán

Hiligaynon

(B) To wait for, to expect. Anganá akó sing diótay nga hóras. Wait for me a little while. Iníng kán-on iangán ko sa kay tátay. This cooked rice I am keeping in expectation of father's coming. Nagaalipasá akó sa pagpaúlì, kay ginaangán akó níla sa pagpanyága. I am in a hurry to get home, for they are waiting for me to come to dinner-or-are waiting dinner for me. (see hulát).


ánggot

Hiligaynon

To get used to take proper food, to get a liking for, or to relish, proper food, applied especially to a baby or to a young animal just weaned. Sang úna iníng tínday nagdolodámgot (nagdolodánggot) lang sang hilamón, ápang karón nagánggot na sa halálbon. Formerly this calf used only to nibble at the grass, but now it is beginning to graze. Bisán lutasón na iníng bátà, kay maánggot na sa pagkáon sing kán-on. There is no harm now in weaning this baby, because it already likes to eat rice.


anók

Hiligaynon

Well cooked, boiled till soft. Anók nga kán-on, lánkà, kamóti, etc. Rice boiled till soft, a well cooked jackfruit, thoroughly done sweet potatoes, etc.


aróad

Hiligaynon

(B) To stuff, cram in (food), eat much. Ginaroádan námon ang pagkáon sa ámon píknik. We ate much at our picnic. Indì mo pagiaróad ang kán-on. Don't stuff in the rice so greedily.


baáng-báang

Hiligaynon

(B) To warm up, get warm by taking a hot drink, food, etc. Baáng-baángi ang ímo solóksolók sing diótay nga kán-on sa walâ pa ikáw magsúgud sang pagpangabúdlay. Warm your stomach with a little rice, before you start your work. Mainúm akó sing maínit nga tsa sa pagbaángbáang sang ákon solóksolók. I am going to drink hot tea to warm my stomach. Imna iníng bíno, kay magapabaángbáang sang ímo solóksolók. Drink this wine, for it will warm you up. (see bagáng).


bagéu

Hiligaynon

Spoilt, rotten, decayed, putrid, tainted (of foodstuffs); to get spoilt, etc. (of food-stuffs). Nagbagéu ang ísdà, kán-on, tinóla, etc. The fish, rice, vegetable dish, etc. spoiled. Indì mo pagpabageuón (pagpabagewón) ang ísdà. Do not allow the fish to go rotten. (see pán-os, báng-og).


báhaw

Hiligaynon

(H) Cold rice, cold food; to become cold (of food); to be cold or indifferent (as regards religion, etc.). May báhaw kamó? Have you any cold rice? Ang kán-on nagbáhaw na. The rice has got cold. Pamáhaw-to breakfast, eat cold food, from the fact that the rice taken at breakfast has usually been cooked the day before. (see kápog, táhaw, búgnaw).


bálon

Hiligaynon

Provisions or food-supplies for a journey; to take provisions along. Nagbálon akó sing tápa. I took dried meat along for the trip. Balóna iníng kán-on. Take this cooked rice with you for the journey. Balóni siá sing pinákas. Give him dried salt fish along as a provision for the journey. Pabalóni siá sing pinákas. Provide him with dried salt fish for the trip. Ipabálon ko sa íla iníng búgsò nga kárne. I will give them this piece of meat along for the trip.


balotanóg

Hiligaynon

Not well done, underdone, parboiled, not sufficiently cooked (of food); healing slowly (of ulcers, etc); desultory, unsatisfactory (of schooling, education, etc.). Also used as a verb. Iníng kán-on balotanóg. This rice is not sufficiently cooked. Ang bakokáng balotanóg. The carbuncle called "bakokáng" is slow in healing. Balotanóg gid lámang ang íya panoón. His schooling was very desultory or quite insufficient. Dílì mo pagpabalotanogón ang pagtíg-ang. Don't only half-cook the rice. (see angól-angól, akúl-akúl).


báng-og

Hiligaynon

Decomposition, putrefaction, rottenness: to decompose, putrify, rot, spoil, go bad so as to be unpalatable or unfit, said of food. Nagbáng-og ang kán-on. The rice spoiled. Nabáng-og ang íla punsyón, kay walâ magabút ang mga inágda. Their banquet got spoilt, because the invited guests did not put in an appearance. Nabang-ogán kamí sing isá ka búgsò nga kárne. One of our pieces of meat became putrid. Indì mo pagpabang-ogón ang ísdà. Don't allow the fish to go bad. (see bagéu, pán-os).


bangál

Hiligaynon

A handful; to take a handful, eat by handfuls. Ibangál ang kán-on. Eat the rice by handfuls. Bangalí (bangalá) ang bábà níya sing kán-on. Put a handful of rice into his mouth. (see hamál, dapál).


basá-bása

Hiligaynon

Cooked rice warmed up again with the addition of a little water; to put water into cooked rice. Basábasáha ang kán-on. Put some water into the rice and warm it. (see linúgaw-rice boiled in much water and stirred about till it gets very soft and porridge-like; hinánggup-cooked rice mixed with water, but not warmed up again).


batá-báta

Hiligaynon

To apportion, divide, distribute, hand out, give out, dole out. Batábatáha ang kán-on. Dole out the rice (equally to all), (see katákáta).


bingahón

Hiligaynon

Pertaining to or mixed with bingá. Walâ akó makakáon, kay bingahón ang kán-on. I could not eat, for the rice was full of bingá.


bókhon

Hiligaynon

Hairy, mixed with-, full of-,-hairs,-filaments. Bókhon nga tinapay, kán-on, sópas, etc. Bread, rice, soup, etc. mixed with filaments. (see bohók, bohokón).


bókod

Hiligaynon

(B) To take up-, grasp-, with one's fingers, to eat with one's fingers. Ang kán-on ginabókod. Rice is eaten with the fingers. Ang mga Amerikáno índì makakibaló magbókod. The Americans do not know how to eat with their fingers. Ibókod lang ang kán-on, kay walâ kitá sing kutsára. Simply eat the rice with your fingers, as we have no spoons. (see húngit, hamál, dapá, timó).


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