Search result(s) - gatóng

gatóng

Hiligaynon

Firewood, fuel. (see galatóng, gátong).



gátong

Hiligaynon

To use as fuel, etc. Igátong iníng káhoy sa kaláyo. Use this wood as fuel for the fire. Gatóngi ang tiníg-ang. Put some fuel under the boiling rice. Ginagátong na lang níla ang mga halígi sang dáan níla nga baláy. They are now using the posts of the old house for firewood. Ipagátong ko na lang iníng kodál nga gabúk sa digamohán. I'll order this rotten fence to be used as fuel in the kitchen. (see alámak, paámak-kindling).


bángday

Hiligaynon

To lie one above or across another in irregular fashion. To place one above or across another. Ibángday iníng halígi sa kawáyan. Lay this post on the bamboo. Bangdayá ang kawáyan kag ang halígi. Lay the bamboo and the post one upon the other. Ayóha ang pagbángday sang gatóng, agúd índì maglunga-óg ang tiníg-ang. Don't lay the fire anyhow, lest the rice should be badly cooked. (see tángday).


bís-ak

Hiligaynon

To cleave, split. Bis-aká ang káhoy. Split the wood. Bis-akí akó sing gatóng. Split some firewood for me. Ibís-ak akó ánay siníng káhoy. Kindly split this wood for me. (see bíal, etc.)


búgkos

Hiligaynon

A bundle, parcel, fagot, faggot, bale, package, anything tied together with a string; to tie, bind together, fasten with a string, make a bundle or parcel of. Bugkosá ang písì, káhoy, pinutús, etc. Tie the rope, the wood, the parcel, etc. Bugkosi akó sing káhoy nga pilá ka nahót. Make me a bundle or fagot of a few sticks of wood. Ibúgkos akó sang ákon kwárta sa ímo nga pányo. Please, tie up my money in your handkerchief. Gatóng nga binugkosán. Firewood made up in fagots or bundles. Ang isá ka búgkos nga káhoy, kawáyan nga liníyas, tubó, tabákò, etc. A bundle of wood, of split bamboo, of sugar-cane, of tobacco-leaves, etc. (see bágtong, putús, binágtong, pinutús).


búgnos

Hiligaynon

To gather-, collect-, remove-, take away-, withdraw-, live coals or firewood, so that a fire may not burn brightly. Bugnosá ang gatóng. Take the firewood off the fire. Bugnosí ang tiníg-ang. Withdraw the firewood from under the freshly cooked rice. Diín ka maghalín?-Sa digamohán, kay nagbúgnos akó sang tiníg-ang. Where do you come from?-From the kitchen, because I have taken the firewood from under the boiling rice.


dát-og

Hiligaynon

(H) To put-, place-, set-, upon (as on a block or some similar support). Idát-og ang líog sang manók sa tapalán, kag laboón. Place the chicken's neck on the block and chop it through. Kon magbíal ikáw sing gatóng, dat-ogí iníng káhoy. When you split firewood, lodge it on this piece of timber. (see dát-ol id.).


galatóng

Hiligaynon

(H) Fuel, fire-wood, kindling wood, firing, faggots. (see gatóng).


hántal

Hiligaynon

To stack, pile up, make a pile of (wood, etc.). Hantalá ang káhoy. Stack the wood. Hantalí akó siníng gatóng. Make for me a pile of this firewood. Ihántal ang káhoy sa idálum sang baláy. Stack the wood under the house. Ihántal akó ánay siníng mga halígi sa bodéga. Please pile up these posts in the store-room. (see kamáda).


kamáda

Hiligaynon

(Probably from the Sp. cama) A stack, heap, pile; to stack or pile wood, etc. Kamadáha ang káhoy. Stack the wood. Ikamáda akó sináng gatóng. Please pile up that fire-wood for me.


láyà

Hiligaynon

To be or become dry, exsiccated, to fade, wither, dry up, shrivel. Ang búlak nga naípò kahápon naláyà (nagkaláyà) na. The flower that was plucked yesterday is dry and shrivelled already. Naláyà na iníng gatóng. This firewood is dry now. Palayáa ang kawáyan ánay kag ugáling guyúron mo. Let the bamboo get dry first and then haul it. Nalayáan kamí sing madámù nga tanúm tungúd sang lakás nga ínit. Many of our plants withered away on account of the excessive heat. (see malá, ugá, layóng, layâ).


mákot

Hiligaynon

To blaze up, begin to burn well after having been kindled, to flame, flare up, burn well, said of fuel (and metaphorically of passions, or the like). Nagamákot na balá ang daíg mo? Is the fire you lighted (lit) burning well? Indì mo pagtandugón ang gatóng, kay walâ pa magmákot ang kaláyo. Don't shift the firewood, for the fire is not yet burning well. Pamakóta ang kaláyo. Let the fire burn well. Wait till the fire burns well. Pamakóti ang kaláyo. Make the fire burn brightly (by putting some kindling material, as shavings, straw, etc. on it). (see haráhará).


ráha

Hiligaynon

(Sp. raja) Split firewood. (see gatóng).


súgnud

Hiligaynon

To stir the fire, push the burning wood inwards, in order that the fire may burn better. Isúgnud ang gatóng sa kaláyo. Stir the fire. Push the fire-wood further into the centre of the fire. Sugnurí ang tiníg-ang. Gather together or stir the fire for boiling rice.


agáy-ay

Hiligaynon

Decomposition, rottenness, decay, blight, produced by the action of small worms, vermin, insects, parasites (both vegetable and animal), the decayed parts frequently being turned into powder. Also used as a verb. May agáy-ay or ginaagáy-ay ang káhoy, bugás, tápì, salúg, etc. The wood-, rice-, board-, floor-, is worm-eaten. Igátong na lang ang inagáy-ay nga káhoy. Use the worm-eaten timber for firewood. Ang kadiós inagay-ayán na man. The black peas have also become infested with blight.