Search result(s) - púli

púli

Hiligaynon

To make common cause against, attack together, mob, fall upon in company with others. Ginpulíhan níla siá. They-fell upon him in a body,-attacked him all together,-mobbed him.



húgnit

Hiligaynon

To fall upon in a body, make common cause against. Indì nínyo siá paghugnitón. Don't fall upon him in a body. Ang mga gamít nga nabilín ni ánhing Fuláno ginhulúgnit sang íya kahinablúsan. All the furniture and clothes of the late N.N. were seized by her nieces and nephews. Ila ginhulúgnit sang sakít ang makáwat nga íla nadákpan. They (all together) maltreated the thief they caught. (see púli).


pulinás

Hiligaynon

Worn, obliterated by use, defaced, battered, sweated, light, bad, false, spurious, base, counterfeit; to be or become worn, etc., particularly applied to coins. Iníng unsíta índì na mabáton, kay nagpulinás. This doubloon will not be accepted,-One cannot pass this doubloon,-because it is worn. Pulinás nga kwárta. Worn out money, that is not fit any longer for currency. False or counterfeit money.


púling

Hiligaynon

A small particle, a tiny splinter, a mote. Also used as a verb. Napúling (Napulíngan) ang matá ko. A speck or mote has got into my eye. May púling ang matá ko. I have a small splinter in my eye.


pulís

Hiligaynon

Police, policeman. See polís id.


tampulingán

Hiligaynon

Staff, pole, shaft, post. Ang tampulingán sang hayáhay. The flagstaff.


tampulingán

Hiligaynon

Well-bucket. See tímbà.


báknal

Hiligaynon

To swell out, be protuberant, bulge, protrude, (as a full pocket or the like). Nagabáknal ang íya bólsa. His pocket bulges. Nabaknalán ang íya bólsa sang kamúnsil. His pocket is stuffed with kamunsel-fruit. Dî mo pagpabaknalón ang ímo bólsa sing lakás, kay básì magísì. Don't stuff your pocket too tight, for it might be torn. Kon mga saráng, tanawá kon may púling ang ákon matá, kay may nagabáknal sa sulúd. Kindly have a look whether there is a speck in my eye, for something is stirring or swelling within it.


buríkat

Hiligaynon

To open, pull asunder, draw apart, unclasp, as a purse, etc. Burikáta ang mga ilalakúb sang íya matá kag usisáon mo kon sa diín ang púling. Press his eyelid open and see where the mote is. (In an obscene sense-aperire vulvam; see bíkat, busíkad, busíksik).


gáhid

Hiligaynon

To clean one's eyes, take out or remove-dust,-a grain of sand,-a mote, etc. from the eye, from a wound or the like by means of a soft, bent material suitable for the operation. Igáhid mo iníng pungángo sang dáhon sang kásla sa ímo matá, agúd makúhà ang púling. Use this leaf-stalk of the casla-plant to clean your eye with, so that the mote may be taken away. Gahíra (-ída) ang ákon matá nga napunô (nabútà) sing yáb-ok. Remove the dust from my eye, for it is full of it. (see kolíkog, káwhi, kúhit).


gúrung

Hiligaynon

Pail, bucket, vessel for drawing water or other liquids; a helper, abettor, procurer. (see tímbà, tampulingán, pasók, kabúlig, mangangapín).


habót

Hiligaynon

Worn-out, used-up, exhausted, dead-beat, done-up; to wear out, etc. Habót na gid akó sa lakás nga pagpangabúdlay. I am now quite worn out by hard work. Habót na ang delárgo ko. My trousers are frayed-or-the worse for wear. Indì mo paghabotón ang bág-o mo nga ulús. Don't wear out your new clothes. Ginahabót gid lang níya ang láwas níya sa walâ sing pulús nga trabáho. He is wearing himself out with useless labour. Nagahabót ang ginháwa ko. I am becoming exhausted. Habót nga háblon. A frail, fragile, warp or an old, worn-out cloth. (see gubát, rabanít, rabót, gurísnay, gúsbat, pulinás, kulirô, lapát).


hámpul

Hiligaynon

A healing ointment, unguent, salve, plaster, poultice, embrocation; to poultice, put on a plaster, salve, etc. Hampulí siá sing mga dáhon sang patáni. Apply patani-leaves to him. Hinampulán níya ang hubág sing aróma. He treated the boil with a plaster prepared from the aroma-plant. Ihámpul sa íya iníng búyò. Apply to him these buyo-leaves. (see támbal).


hápdus

Hiligaynon

To chafe, fret, hurt, make or be sore (of hands, eyes, etc.). Naghápdus ang ákon tiíl sa lakás nga paglakát. My feet are sore on account of so much walking. Nahapdusán ang ákon tiíl, kay gutúk ang sapátos ko. My feet have become sore, because my boots are tight. Ang pagbayó nagpahápdus sang íya kamót. Pounding rice chafed his hands. Pinahápdus sang púling ang ákon matá. The mote made my eye sore. (see hápdì).


kímpul

Hiligaynon

Mutilated, maimed, having parts, ends, corners or edges broken or cut off; to break off ends, etc., to mutilate or become mutilated, to dock. Nagkímpul ang íya túdlò. His finger is mutilated. Kimpulá ang íkog sang idô. Dock the dog's tail. Kimpulí ang manók sang íya íkog, agúd makilála nga áton. Cut off part of the cock's tail, so that it may be recognized as ours. (see kúmpul).


lúhà

Hiligaynon

Tear, tear-drop; to fill with tears, water, be wet with tears, shed tears. Nagalúhà ang ákon matá, kay napúling. My eye is watering, because a mote got into it. Naglúhà ang matâ níya. Her eyes filled with tears. Ginluháan níya sing mapaít ang kamatáyon sang íya anák. She shed bitter tears over the death of her child.


píti, pití

Hiligaynon

To finger, handle, fumble, touch or toy with the fingers; to twist, roll (between the fingers). Ngáa nga ginapíti (ginapití) mo lang ang balasahón nga walâ mo pagabasáha? Why are you fingering the paper without reading it? Pitíha (Pitihá) ang púsud sináng pányò nga sóklà kag ikúhit sang púling sa íya matá. Roll up the corner of that silk handkerchief and remove with it the mote from his eye.


tímbà

Hiligaynon

A bucket, pail, receptacle to draw water from a well or cistern called áwang. (see tampulingán).


úsug

Hiligaynon

To rub (one's eyes). Magúsug ka sang (Usúga ang) ímo matá túbtub nga maggwâ ang púling. Rub your eye till the mote comes out.


úsug

Hiligaynon

To rub (one's eyes). Magúsug ka sang (Usúga ang) ímo matá túbtub nga maggwâ ang púling. Rub your eye till the mote comes out.