Search result(s) - ántà

ánta

Hiligaynon

To smell of scorched or burned food; the smell of burned food. (see ángtod, ántod, antóos).



antâ

Hiligaynon

Tame, domesticated, broken in, trained, (see mánso).


antà

Hiligaynon

To tame, train, break in, domesticate. Antaá ang karabáw nga simarón. Train or tame the wild buffalo. Gamíta iníng bolobód nga iántà mo sa iláhas. Make use of this poultry-food to tame the wild chicken. Sa mabúot nga pahítò maántà man ang león, Under wise management even a lion can be tamed. (see pahagúp, ánad, buyó, rumál).


antó-os

Hiligaynon

The smell of burning or scorching food; to emit such a smell. Nagaantó-os ang tiníg-ang. There is a smell of burning coming from the boiling rice. Ginaanto-osán akó sang tinóla. It seems to me that the vegetables are being scorched. (see ángtod, ánta, ántod, all having the same meaning).


dumár

Hiligaynon

(Sp. domar) To train, tame, break in, domesticate. Makahibaló ka balá magdumár sang kabáyo? Do you know how to train horses? Hóo, kay madámù na ang ákon gindumár. Yes, for I have trained many before this. Dumahá iníng simarón nga karabáw. Tame this wild buffalo. Ipadumár ko sa ímo ang ákon kabáyo, kay akó índì makadaúg sa íya. I will let you break in my horse, for I cannot subdue it. (see ántà).


hagúp

Hiligaynon

To be tame, domesticated, broken in, gentle, meek, docile. Naghagúp na ang iláhas. The wild chicken has become tame now. Pahagupá ang simarón nga karabáw, báka, etc. Tame the wild buffalo, cow, etc. Pahagupí akó siníng períko. Tame this parrot for me. Ipahagúp ko sa ímo iníng kabáyo, kay índì akó makasaráng. I'll give this horse to you to train (break in), for I cannot do it. (see ántà, mánso).


mánso

Hiligaynon

(Sp. manso) Tame, domestic, domesticated, gentle, meek, willing, broken in, well trained, subdued, tractable. (see mahagúp, mabúot, antâ).


pangánta

Hiligaynon

Freq. of kánta-to sing. Freq. of ánta-smell of burnt food.


rumál

Hiligaynon

(Sp. domar) To tame, break in, subdue, train; to gallop. Rumalá ang kabáyo. Break in or tame the horse. Irumál akó sináng kabáyo. Kindly break in that horse for me. Batíd siá magrumál sing mga kabáyo. He is an expert in training horses. (see ánad, hánas, ántà, antâ).


adelantádo

Hiligaynon

(Sp. adelantado) Progressive, advanced, modern; fast (of a watch). (see mainuswagón, matín-ad, madásig).


adelantár

Hiligaynon

(Sp. adelantar) To promote, ameliorate, introduce progressive methods or modern inventions; to advance, put on. Adelantahí akó ánay sing kwárta. Advance me some money. Paadelantahá ang taknáan (relóh) sing napúlò ka minuto. Put on the clock ten minutes. Kon magadelantár ikáw sa ákon sing napúlò ka mángmang magakosinéro mo akó. If you advance me ten pesos I am willing to become your cook.


agwánta

Hiligaynon

(Sp. aguantar) To bear, tolerate, suffer, let pass, put up with. Dáw dílì na akó makaagwánta sinâ. I seem not to be able to bear it any longer. Anhon mo, kóndì magagwánta lang? What can you do, but suffer it patiently? Agwantahá lang! Just bear it with resignation! (see batás, ántus).


agwantádo

Hiligaynon

(Sp. aguantádo) Robust, strong with great powers of resistance to fatigue, pain and stress; one who can stand or bear much, one suffering patiently or with fortitude. Agwantádo siá sa tungâ sang tanán nga pagpangabúdlay kag kalisdánan. He bears up bravely in the midst of all fatigues and difficulties. Dúro siá kaagwantádo. He can stand very much. He is able to bear-, support-, a good deal.


ántad

Hiligaynon

Distance, separation, difference; to make room, give way, yield space. Malayô ang ántad. The distance is great or far. Malayô silá sing ántad. They are far asunder. Antará (-adá) ang síya. Put the chair farther away. Antarí nínyo ang lugár. Make room. Iántad ang mga hinaláy. Space what is hung on the line farther apart. Magántad kamó. Give way. Make room. Ipaántad sa íya ang mga nalábhan nga hinaláy. Let her space farther apart the washed clothes hung on the line. Ang íya nga sinabát malayô sing ántad sa patád. His answer is beside the mark i.e. his answer is vague, evasive.


antáray

Hiligaynon

Distance, separation, interstice, interval; to be distant (separate, away) one from another. Limá ka tápak ang íla antáray. Nagaantáray silá sing limá ka tápak. There is a distance (an open space) of five feet between them. They are spaced five feet apart. (see ántad, bál-ot).


ántaw

Hiligaynon

Visible from afar, prominent. (see pántaw).


ántay

Hiligaynon

To move, to transfer one's residence, go to live somewhere else, to carry or transport to some other place. Nagántay kamí sa umá sang tigtalánum. During the planting-season we lived at the farm. Iántay ang mga kasangkápan sa bánwa. Transfer your outfit to the town. Kon matápus ang áni maántay kamí liwán sa bánwa. After the rice-harvest we shall move to town again. Antayi ang umá mo sa bakólod, kay maáyo sa ímo láwas ang pagpuyô mo didto. Go to live at your farm on the hill, for staying there is good for your health. (see líton).


balántak

Hiligaynon

Bamboo, bolo, or the like, woven into the walls or partitions of a building. The bamboo is flattened into broad strips and the weaving is done (usually) not upright and across, but diagonally. Also verb: to make or apply balántak. Ang balántak, kon maáyo ang trabáho, matahúm nga tulúkon. Balántak weaving, if well done, is beautiful to look upon. Balantakí ang idálum sang talamwáan. Place balántak-work under the window. Balantaká ang pagdíngding. Weave the partitions in balántak-fashion. Díngding nga binalántak. Sides or partitions woven in the manner of balántak. (see rára-to weave baskets, mats, etc.; tádtad-to flatten bamboo, etc. for balántak-work).


balántang

Hiligaynon

Symmetry; balance; proportion; to be symmetrical, harmonious, well proportioned, well set-up, balanced. Nagakabalántang ang íya dágway. His figure is well proportioned. (see kamalántang).


bántà

Hiligaynon

Opinion, guess, surmise, conjecture; to opine, think, guess, surmise, conjecture. Sa ákon bántà or bolobántà --. In my opinion --. Ginabántà níya nga ang duhá ka gántang nga bugás ígò sa panyága sang napúlò kag ápat ka táo. He thinks that two gantas of hulled rice are sufficient for fourteen persons to eat at dinner-or-are enough to feed fourteen persons at dinner. Bantaá sing maáyo ang túbig sang ginatíg-ang. Guess well the quantity of water required for the rice you are going to boil. Binántà níla nga kon sumakáy silá sa áuto, makadángat silá sa Ilóng-ílong sa sulúd sang isá ka táknà. They thought that, if they rode in an automobile, they would reach Iloilo within an hour. (see bánà, banâbánà, hunâhúnà).


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