Search result(s) - línas

línas

Hiligaynon

To tread, trample upon, applied especially to the separating of rice-grains from the ears by trampling on them. Linása ang humáy. Tread the rice. Linásan akó nímo sing tátlo ka pásong nga humáy. Tread three bushels of rice for me. Maálam ka balá maglínas? Do you know how to tread rice? Ginlínas gid lang níya ang ákon katarúngan. He trampled on my rights. He spurned my arguments. (see lápak, tápak).



lás-ay

Hiligaynon

Insipidity, mawkishness, tastelessness; to be, make or become insipid, mawkish, unappetizing, tasteless, abominable, disgusting. Walâ gid sing lás-ay iníng pagkáon. This food has nothing of insipidity about it. This food tastes fine or nice. Naglás-ay iníng bíno, kay nasimbúgan sing hinébra. This wine has lost its flavour, for it has been mixed with gin. Nalas-ayán akó sa íya. He is abominable to me. I am disgusted with him. Las-ayá lang ang íla pagkáon, kay támà kadalók sa íla. Make their food tasteless, because they are too greedy. Linas-ayán (pinalas-ayán) akó níla dídto sing pagkáon. They gave me there tasteless or insipid food. Urúton (Saídon) mo iní sang káon karón, kay sa buás magalás-ay. Eat this up now, for to-morrow it will be stale, vapid, mawkish, unappetizing, flat. (see báng-aw, pán-os, lán-o, maláin, etc.).


linasán

Hiligaynon

An elevated platform, usually a kind of bamboo-flooring, for threshing rice by treading. (see línas, bayáwbáyaw, pápag).


pulinás

Hiligaynon

Worn, obliterated by use, defaced, battered, sweated, light, bad, false, spurious, base, counterfeit; to be or become worn, etc., particularly applied to coins. Iníng unsíta índì na mabáton, kay nagpulinás. This doubloon will not be accepted,-One cannot pass this doubloon,-because it is worn. Pulinás nga kwárta. Worn out money, that is not fit any longer for currency. False or counterfeit money.


bayáw-báyaw

Hiligaynon

A bamboo bench as often used in Philippine houses and boats; a raised bamboo floor or platform for treading out rice, known also as "linasán" and "pápag".


habót

Hiligaynon

Worn-out, used-up, exhausted, dead-beat, done-up; to wear out, etc. Habót na gid akó sa lakás nga pagpangabúdlay. I am now quite worn out by hard work. Habót na ang delárgo ko. My trousers are frayed-or-the worse for wear. Indì mo paghabotón ang bág-o mo nga ulús. Don't wear out your new clothes. Ginahabót gid lang níya ang láwas níya sa walâ sing pulús nga trabáho. He is wearing himself out with useless labour. Nagahabót ang ginháwa ko. I am becoming exhausted. Habót nga háblon. A frail, fragile, warp or an old, worn-out cloth. (see gubát, rabanít, rabót, gurísnay, gúsbat, pulinás, kulirô, lapát).


láslas

Hiligaynon

To tear or pull off with some force (a vine, thatched roof, etc.). Laslasá ang balágon, ang kógon sa atóp, etc. Tear off the climbing plants, the cogon-grass from the roof, etc. Metaphorically: Nalaslasán (linaslasán) akó níya sing maláut nga mga púlong. He abused me and used bad language. (see lalás, káskas).


láswa

Hiligaynon

Vegetables; dishes of vegetables; to use or prepare vegetables. Laswahón ko iníng mga balátong. I will prepare these vegetables as a side-dish. Laswahí si Fuláno sing dágmay. Provide N.N. with dágmay-vegetables. Linaswahán níla ang panyága sing manámit nga mga lalaswáhon. They got ready some very tasty vegetables for dinner. (see útan, ulutanón).


pápag

Hiligaynon

A bamboo stretcher; a bamboo platform used for treading out rice and the like, any square bamboo frame made in the form of a hurdle or of a table-top. (see liyálíya, linasán, bayáw-báyaw).