Search result(s) - púro

púro

Hiligaynon

(Sp. puro) Pure, unmixed, unadulterated. (see púlaw, púraw, pulús, lúnsay, lúgus).



purô

Hiligaynon

(B) See polô-island, etc.


bús-og

Hiligaynon

Pure, unadulterated, unalloyed, undefiled; solid, not hollow. (see lubús, bilóg, búg-os, túnay, lúnsay, púro, hímpit).


lúgus

Hiligaynon

Pure, unadulterated, undefiled, genuine, unalloyed. (see lubús, púro, pulús, bús-og, lónlon, lúnsay, túnay).


lúnlun

Hiligaynon

Pure, unadulterated, perfect, genuine. (see túnay, lubús, lúgus, lúnsay, bús-og, púro).


To do something thoroughly, heartily, earnestly; to make pure or perfect. (see púro).


púraw

Hiligaynon

Pure, unmixed, etc. See púlaw, púro, pulús, lúnlun, pasáy, lúnsay, lúgus, lubús.


purogí-ot

Hiligaynon

Upset, troubled, at a loss; to be at a loss, upset, not to know what to do or where to turn. (see libúg, lingín).


purogían

Hiligaynon

(B) The cloth-roller in a loom on which the web or newly woven cloth is wound up. (púgì, pulogían).


púron

Hiligaynon

(B) See pólon.


alóghog

Hiligaynon

A running line, any rope or string, attached by means of rings or a channel, through which it passes, to a garment, curtain, fishing-net or the like; any other material used in a similar way and for the same purpose; to attach or provide such a rope, etc. Aloghogí ang puróy mo. Put a running string to your short breeches. Ialóghog ang písì. Put the cord through its channel (or rings, as the case may be). Ialóghog ang alóghog sa íya nga aloghogán. Thread the cord through the rings, blocks, tubes, hem, etc. Ginpakábit níla ang kúmbong sa lúbid nga. inogalóghog (inalóghog). They hung up the curtain on a running rope. (see halóghog id. and the more usual form).


ántip

Hiligaynon

The pole that passes through the end of the web and is fastened by ropes to the body of the weaver in a primitive kind of weaving without the use of a loom. Nowadays nearly every household has a loom, called tidál or terál, a corruption of the Sp. telar. (see átip, purogían).


bahág

Hiligaynon

A loin cloth; to wear only a loin-cloth. Indì ka magbahág, kóndì magpuróy ka gid. Don't go out in a loin-cloth, but wear at least short breeches. Bahagá lang yanáng hénero. Simply use that cloth as a cover for your loins. Pabahagí siá. Have a loin-cloth put on him. Provide him with a loin-cloth. Ang mga mananggéte nagabahág. Tuba-gatherers wear loin-cloths.


delárgo

Hiligaynon

(Sp. de largo) Long trousers, pantaloons, pants, breeches, small-clothes; to wear trousers, etc. Nagadelárgo na iníng bátà. This boy is wearing long trousers already. Kon magbáklay ka sa bakólod índì ka magdelárgo, kóndì magpuróy ka lang. If you go over the hill, don't wear long trousers, but knee-breeches, knickerbockers, shorts. (see sárwal, pantelón, puróy).


guríbhay

Hiligaynon

Dilapidated, frayed, the worse for wear, torn, old, shabby, stained and soiled, deteriorated or injured by wear; to be frayed, etc. Guríbhay na ang ákon delárgo. My trousers are old and worn out. Nagguríbhay ang íya puróy sa dáyon nga paggámit. His shorts are worn out by constant use. (see gurísnay, gúsbat, gubát, gunít).


líkis

Hiligaynon

To take the warp from the warping board and arrange it on the loom; to coil, wind (the woven cloth on the cloth-roller). Likísa ang sináb-ong. Transfer the warp from the warping board to the loom. Likísa ang hinabúl. Wind the woven cloth on the roller (pulugian, purogían). (see balólon, lolón, lókot-to roll up mats; álas-to coil, wind up ropes).


likisán

Hiligaynon

A cloth-roller, the revolving beam in a loom on which the finished cloth is wound, anything used like a cloth-roller. (see pulogían, purogían).


lógho

Hiligaynon

To drop, fall down, sink, descend, get loose and come down unnoticed, as clothes that are only carelessly secured. Nalógho (Nagkalógho) ang íya patádyong. Her skirt became loose (has become loose) and dropped (has dropped). Andam ka, agúd índì malógho (magkalógho) ang ímo puróy. Be on your guard, lest your short trousers should get loose, drop or come down. Sing masamí ginaloghohán sang íla delárgo ang mga bátà nga walâ pa maánad sa pagdalá sang amó nga panápton. Quite frequently the pants get loose of boys not yet accustomed to wear such articles of dress. (see dágdag, lóyloy).


lóslos

Hiligaynon

To get loose, drop, come down, fall down, sink lower, said of things that are not fastened well, sag, droop, hang loose, dangle. Naglóslos ang kawáyan sang kodál, kay gabúk ang higót, kay nasakán sang táo, etc. The bamboo got loose from the fence for the ties are rotten, because people stepped on it, etc. Naloslosán ang búgsok sang láta. The cross-pieces got loose from the stake. Húgta ang paghigót sang halóghog, kay nagalóslos ang ímo puróy. Fasten the slip-cord tightly, for your short pants are coming down. (see lógho).


patábas

Hiligaynon

Caus. of tábas-to cut (clothes, etc.). Mapatábas akó sa sástre sing isá ka delárgo. I'll get the tailor to make me a pair of trousers. Ipatábas ko sa sástre iníng heneró. I will let the tailor cut this cloth. Patabási si tótò sing puróy, kay dakû na. Let a pair of short trousers (knickerbockers) be made for the boy, for he is quite big now. Tatáy, patabási akó sing bág-o nga báyò. Please father, have a new jacket (dress) made for me.


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