Search result(s) - sáid

sáid

Hiligaynon

(B) To finish, use or eat up all. Nasáid mo galî ang kán-on? (Naúrut mo galî ang kán-on?). Have you really finished all the rice? Nasáid ron (Naúrut na) ang káhoy, kwárta, maís, etc. The wood, money, corn, etc. is finished or all used up. Saídon (Urúton) mo lang ang kárne sa (panyága) ígmà, hay ang ihápon báklan ko ti bág-o (kay ang panihápon pagabáklan ko sing bág-o). Use up all the meat there is for dinner, as I shall buy a fresh supply for supper. Indì nánda masáid kang káon ang ísdà. (Indì níla maúrut sang káon (sa pagkáon) iníng ísdà). They cannot eat up this fish. (see úbus, tápus, úrut).



ábri

Hiligaynon

(Sp. abrir) To unlock, unfasten, open; to begin, commence, said of schools, classes, sessions, meetings, etc. Abrihi ang puérta, ang bintánà, etc. Open the door, the window, etc. Naabrihán na ang mga kláse. Classes have commenced. Ang makáwat walâ makaábri sang káha. The thief could not unlock-, open-, the safe. Kon walâ ka sing yábi nga ikaábri sa ganháan, bingkalá na lang. If you have no key that can unlock the door, simply burst the door in. (see bukás).


ágas

Hiligaynon

To close, heal, form scabs (said of small-pox, measles and other diseases affecting the skin). Ang butí nagaágas na. The small-pox is forming scabs, is slowly healing. Ginaagásan na ang bátà sang típgas (típdas, tígpas), butí, etc. The child is now recovering from measles, small-pox, etc.


ágbà

Hiligaynon

Dumb, mum, silent, taciturn (applied to persons who habitually talk little, and rarely allow themselves to be drawn into a conversation, but particularly said of those, who on being questioned or asked an explanation keep a sullen or stubborn silence). Agbà nga táo. A very taciturn man. Iníng batà ágbà gid. This is a very stubborn child from whom it is difficult to get an answer to questions. Kaágbà sa ímo. How stubborn you are! Have you lost your tongue! Indì ka maginágbà or magpakaágbà. Don't pretend to be deaf and dumb. Don't act as if you could not speak. (N.B. ágbà is related to apâ, but in speaking of persons afflicted with dumbness "apâ" only is used and never "ágbà").


agî

Hiligaynon

Soft, effeminate, not manly, said of men with feminine voice and manners, hermaphrodite.


ákmol

Hiligaynon

Crustiness, thickness; to thicken, to harden, become crusty, to crust or incrust, said of dirt, dusty perspiration on the body, too much starch on clothes and the like. Nagákmol sa íya nawóng ang bálhas kag bulíng. Perspiration and dirt incrusted his face or his face was coated with sweat and dust. May duhá ukón tátlo ka báhin sang ákon báyò nga ginpaákmol sang mamumunák sang almidón. My dress was coated with starch in two or three places by the washerwoman. Kabáskug siníng pakô nga naakmolán sang almidón! Oh, the stiffness of this over-starched sleeve! (see dákmol, dámol, ápol).


alabúton

Hiligaynon

One subject to periodical fits, especially said of idiots, maniacs, lunatics with lucid intervals of some duration, but liable at any moment to fall back into their former mental derangement. (ábut, abút).


alagílang

Hiligaynon

(H) Old, yellow leaves, attached still to the plant, but about to fall off; old, withered, dry, sear, sere, said of leaves. Ang alagílang nga dáhon madalî madágdag. The dry leaves will soon fall to the ground.


alamág

Hiligaynon

Flash, spark, sparkle, scintillation, glittering, glistening, said of a fire-fly, of the scales of a fish, or the like; phosphorescence. (see alámag).


álan

Hiligaynon

Rancidity, rankness of taste or smell; to become rancid, rank, strong-scented, turn bad, said of fats, oils, bacon and the like. Nagálan na galî ang tosíno. After all the bacon has gone rancid. Naalánan akó sang búnga. I became dizzy from chewing betelnut. Amligí ang mantéka, agúd índì magálan. Take care of the lard, lest it should turn bad.


alapláag

Hiligaynon

(H) To disperse, spread, separate, (said of crowds, clouds, smoke, etc.). Ang asó nagaalapláag. The smoke is dispersing. Ang mga táo kon maggwâ sa simbáhan magaalapláag sa madalî. The people, when they come out of church, will soon disperse. Alaplaága ang mga bátà, háyup, etc. Make the children, the cattle, etc. spread, or separate, in different directions. (see aláplag, lápnag, lápta).


álay

Hiligaynon

Stiffness, tiredness; to be or become stiff and tired from a long walk, overwork or the like, said especially of limbs and muscles. Nagálay ang íya páa. His leg has become stiff. Naalayán akó. I am stiff and tired. Metaphorically: Ginaalayán akó siníng mga bátà. I am getting tired of,-disgusted with-, these children. (see kápoy, kotóy, páol).


álhom

Hiligaynon

(H) Not burning well, that does not soon catch fire, difficult to light, said of green wood, wet leaves, tobacco, cigars, etc. Also used as a verb: to be or become difficult to light, etc. Alhom kaáyo iníng abáno. This cigars burns very badly. Naalhomán siá sang ákon abáno. He could not light the cigar I gave him, or he had difficulty in lighting my cigar. Dî mo pagpaalhomón ang tabákò. Be careful with the tobacco, lest it should get wet, burn badly or be difficult to light, (see arúm).


alikabút

Hiligaynon

To rise, soar, fly aloft, mount upwards as on wings (said of wind, dust, etc.). (see alintabó).


alingása

Hiligaynon

Noise, hubbub, clamour, disturbance; disturbing, trying or tiringly noisy, even if not very loud; to be or get noisy, said of children in school, of people talking and laughing during a discourse, in a theatre, meeting or the like. Alingása nga kagáhud! Kaalingása siníng mga táo. What a noise! How noisy these men are. Naalingasáhan akó sa íya. He became a nuisance to me on account of the disturbing noise he made. Indì kamó magalingása. Don't make a noise. Don't be noisy. (see alingá-ut id.).


alóm

Hiligaynon

Dark, dim, dimmed, tarnished, lack-lustre, having lost lustre or shine; to be or become dark, to lose lustre or whiteness, said of metals, skin, surface of furniture and the like. (see ilóm, itúm).


aluká-it

Hiligaynon

Empty, deprived of contents, said of husks and pods, especially the emptied kamunsel husks; empty-headed, stupid, brainless. (It is to be noted that the aluká-it are still attached to the plant, but empty through the action of birds or vermin. Otherwise empty pods are called "úpak", the general name for the exterior coating of fruits, as: skin, husk, pod, peel, rind).


alumílaw

Hiligaynon

(H) Very light, not deep, easily to be awakened from, with half-closed eyes, said of sleep. Nagkatulúg ikáw?-Hóo, ápang alumílaw lang ang ákon panúlug. Did you sleep?-Yes, but I was only dozing, my sleep was very light. (alamílaw id.).


amalánhig

Hiligaynon

One who appears after death and haunts houses, etc.; a ghost, spectre, phantom, spirit, shade, wraith, spook, apparition; to appear after death, to haunt. Nakítà balá nínyo ang amalánhig? Have you seen the apparition? Si Fuláno, konó, nagaamalánhig sa íya baláy. N.N., they say, is haunting his house. May amalánhig iníng baláy. This house is haunted by a spectre. Indì ka magpáti sináng mga ginasugídsúgid nga mga amalánhig. Don't believe the stories about people who are said to have risen from the grave or who appear in-, haunt-, houses. (see amamánhig, malánhig, maránhig).


ámbi

Hiligaynon

Open or exposed to the rain; to enter, come through, said of rain being driven in by the wind through an open door or window or the like. Nagaámbi ang ulán. The rain is coming in. Ang ámon kalán-an ginaambihán sang ulán. The rain is coming into our dining room. Ang ákon kwárto ámbi sa ulán. My room is exposed to the rain. Kon mamádlus ang hángin maambihán ka dirí sang ulán. If the wind is strong the rain will drive in here where you are. (see ábong-open to the wind).


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