Search result(s) - íntò

íntok

Hiligaynon

(B) Small, tiny, little, wee; consisting of small pieces or particles; to be or become small, etc. (see diótay, dítay, gamáy, gágmay, dítik, ikì, isót, tikî, kayót).



íntok

Hiligaynon

(B) Small, tiny, little, wee; consisting of small pieces or particles; to be or become small, etc. (see diótay, dítay, gamáy, gágmay, dítik, ikì, isót, tikî, kayót).


kaíntok

Hiligaynon

(B) Smallness, littleness, diminutiveness. (see íntok, kagamáy, kadiótay, kaisót, katikî).


karintóndan

Hiligaynon

A kind of banana. (see kúndal, túndal, térna).


kíntos

Hiligaynon

(Sp. quinto, quintar) The law of requisition for military purposes; to draft men for-, press into-, service. Nakintosán siá sídto ánay. He was drafted for military service in bygone days.


líntok

Hiligaynon

(H) The smaller, finer particles of rice chaff after pounding, bran, usually fed to pigs, etc. The larger parts (lábhang) are made use of for cleaning plates or the like. (see upá).


líntong

Hiligaynon

To be confused, worried, perplexed. Nagalíntong ang íya úlo karón tungúd sang íya útang. He is worried now about his debt. Nagapalíntong siá sang íya úlo. He is cudgelling his brains. (see libúg).


maíntok

Hiligaynon

(B) Small, little, wee, tiny, minute, fine, consisting of small, tiny pieces or particles. (see íntok, magamáy, diótay, etc.).


paalínton

Hiligaynon

Transference, transfer, conveyance, communication, tradition; to transfer, hand down, etc. (see alínton).


abáyan

Hiligaynon

Liable to fall under a spell by which a benefit is changed into its opposite evil. Indì mo pagsingganán ang bátà nga matámbok siá, kay básì abáyan. Don't tell the child that it is fat, because it might fall under an evil spell (and become lean or sick). N. B. This is a superstition. It is likely that after "abáyan" "sang áswang" is understood.


abibár

Hiligaynon

(Sp. avivar) To urge, stimulate, animate, enliven, quicken, rouse. Abibahá siá. Urge him to greater exertions. Rouse or stimulate him. Abibahí ang íla trabáho. Put some liveliness-, animation-, energy-, into their work.


abláy

Hiligaynon

(B) Shawl, covering for the shoulders and back; to use or wear a shawl. Tan-awá yanáng babáye nga nagaabláy. Look at that woman wearing a shawl. Pagaablayón ko gid iníng bunáng. I will certainly work this yarn up into a shawl. Iabláy lang iníng hábul, kay mátugnaw. Just use this blanket as a shawl, for it is cold. Ablayí ang bátà, agúd indì mapás-* mo sa matúgnaw nga hángin. Put a shawl around the child, lest it should catch a cold in the chilly air. Paablayí silá. Provide them with shawls. Put some shawls at their disposal, (see abrígo, kúnop).


abó

Hiligaynon

Ash, ashes; to treat with ash, apply ashes, use ashes; to turn into or become ashes. Abohí ang púsud sang bátà. Treat the baby's navel with ash. Nag-*abó ang ámon baláy sa kaláyo or ginabó sang kaláyo ang ámon balay. The fire burned our house to ashes. Abohán mo ang pínggan kag báso, agúd makúhà ang kadánlug. Clean the plate and glass with ashes, so that the greasy dirt may be removed. Ang abó nga ginpát-in sa áton mga ágtang sa ádlaw nga Miérkoles de Senísa (Ceniza) amó ang abó sang mga pálua (ráamos) nga nabenditáhan sang ádlaw nga Domingo de Rámos. The ashes with which our foreheads are marked on Ash-Wednesday are the ashes of the palms blessed on Palm-Sunday. Dílì mo pag-*ipaabó sa íya iníng mga tulún-an, kay bisán dumáan na may kapuslánan pa. Don't let him burn these books, for, though they are old, they are still of use. (see ágbon).


aborído

Hiligaynon

(Sp. aburrido) Worried, vexed, uneasy, disturbed, upset; to be-, become-, worried, etc. Tungúd siná ganî nagaborído akó. Just on that account I got upset. Ginpaaborído akó sináng kasábà. That lawsuit worries me. Nagpaaborído siá sa ákon. He vexed or worried me. (see palibúg, palíntong, sang, ólo).


adóbo

Hiligaynon

(Sp. adobo) A dish of meat cut up or sliced and mixed with vinegar and various spices; to make or serve adóbo. Adobóha ang báboy. Work the pork up into adóbo. Bákli akó sing kárne, kay adobóhon ko sa panyága. Buy me some meat, for I am going to prepare from it a dish of adóbo for dinner. Anhon mo iníng kárne?-Adobóhon ko. What are you going to do with this meat?-I am going to make adóbo of it. Adobóhi ang mga bisíta. Treat the visitors to a dish of adóbo. Makahíbalo ka magadóbo? Do you know how to prepare adóbo? Anhon mo iníng lánggaw?-Iadóbo ko sa kárne. What are you using this vinegar for?-I am going to use it for a dish of adóbo.


ágay

Hiligaynon

To trickle, dribble, run down in drops, flow slowly and gently. Naga-*ágay ang mapaít níya nga lúhà kag nagatúlò sa íya kamót. Her bitter tears are trickling down and dropping on her hand. Ináng kalisúd nagpaágay sang íya mga lúhà. That trouble brought tears into her eyes. Ang masakit nga bátà ginapaagáyan sing madámù nga mga lúhà sang íya ilóy. The sick child is being much wept over by its mother. Nagbúswang na ang íya hubág kag nagágay ang nánà. His boil burst and the pus flowed out. Nagpangabúdlay siá sing támà sa ínit nga ang masulúg nga bálhas nagágay sa tanán nga mga buhôbúhò sang íya pánit. He worked very hard in the heat of the sun, so that streams of perspiration poured from all the pores of his skin. (see tubúd, túlò, talabirís, tululágay, ílig).


agáy-ay

Hiligaynon

Decomposition, rottenness, decay, blight, produced by the action of small worms, vermin, insects, parasites (both vegetable and animal), the decayed parts frequently being turned into powder. Also used as a verb. May agáy-ay or ginaagáy-ay ang káhoy, bugás, tápì, salúg, etc. The wood-, rice-, board-, floor-, is worm-eaten. Igátong na lang ang inagáy-ay nga káhoy. Use the worm-eaten timber for firewood. Ang kadiós inagay-ayán na man. The black peas have also become infested with blight.


ágbà

Hiligaynon

Dumb, mum, silent, taciturn (applied to persons who habitually talk little, and rarely allow themselves to be drawn into a conversation, but particularly said of those, who on being questioned or asked an explanation keep a sullen or stubborn silence). Agbà nga táo. A very taciturn man. Iníng batà ágbà gid. This is a very stubborn child from whom it is difficult to get an answer to questions. Kaágbà sa ímo. How stubborn you are! Have you lost your tongue! Indì ka maginágbà or magpakaágbà. Don't pretend to be deaf and dumb. Don't act as if you could not speak. (N.B. ágbà is related to apâ, but in speaking of persons afflicted with dumbness "apâ" only is used and never "ágbà").


ágbon

Hiligaynon

(H) Fine ashes, cigar-ash; to be converted into ashes. Ang ákon abáno nagágbon na. My cigar is converted into ashes. Pilá ka abáno ang ginaágbon mo sa isá ka ádlaw? How many cigars do you convert into ashes in the course of one day? (see abó).


ágpang

Hiligaynon

A hank of yarn or thread. Also used as a verb. Agpangá ang binúlung nga búlak sang búlak. Make up the spun cotton into hanks. Bunáng nga inágpang. Yarn in hanks, yarn by the hank. (see labág).


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