Search result(s) - árnis

árnis

Hiligaynon

Fight, quarrel; to fight, quarrel, come to blows. Si Huán kag si Pédro nagaarnísay. Peter and John are fighting, have come to blows, are quarrelling. (see híbag, ális).



ális

Hiligaynon

To fight, come to blows. Naga-ális or nagaalisáy ang mga bátà. The boys are fighting, have come to blows. Alísi siá! Fight him! Iális ko sa íya ining bastón. I'll fight him with this stick. Indì ka mangális sa mga bátà nga magamáy. Don't fight-, quarrel with-, small boys. (see árnis, áway).


áway

Hiligaynon

Fight, battle, struggle, conflict, fray, strife, contention, tussle, scuffle, scrimmage, encounter, fighting, quarrelling, war, combat; to fight, quarrel, come to blows, go to war, etc. Nagaáway silá. They are fighting or quarrelling. Nagakaáway silá. They are enemies. Dílì kamó mag-ináway or mag-ilináway. Don't fight or quarrel amongst yourselves. Anó ang ginawáyan nínyo kahápon sang hápon? What were you quarrelling about yesterday evening? Awáyon ko gid siá. I am certainly going to fight him. Tápus na ang dakû nga áway sa Orópa. The great war in Europe is finished. (see kaáway, kaawáyan, kaawayón, mangangawáy, ális, árnis, bagâ, bángig, banggiánay, etc.).


karamútot

Hiligaynon

To scuffle, scramble, fight, to compete eagerly for the possession of something. Nagakaramútot silá sa pagágaw sang mga bukáka-or-ginakaramutótan níla ang pagágaw sang mga bukáka. They are scrambling for the ripe camunsel-fruit. Indì kamó magkaramútot. Don't scuffle (scramble, fight). (see ális, árnis, áway, kámas).


barnís

Hiligaynon

(Sp. barniz) Varnish, lacquer; to varnish, lacquer. Barnisí ang aparadór. Varnish the cupboard.


gwarnisyón

Hiligaynon

(Sp. guarnición) Harness, gears, traces of mules and horses, complete equipment for a riding-or draught-horse; garrison (of soldiers).


alóm

Hiligaynon

Dark, dim, dimmed, tarnished, lack-lustre, having lost lustre or shine; to be or become dark, to lose lustre or whiteness, said of metals, skin, surface of furniture and the like. (see ilóm, itúm).


arúm

Hiligaynon

Dark; tarnished; to darken, blacken, lose lustre, tarnish. See alóm id. Ang buláwan walâ pagarúm, ápang ang tumbága nagaarúm. Gold does not lose its lustre, but pinchbeck does. (see itúm).


dáplas

Hiligaynon

To smear-, plaster-, over, coat, daub, surface, give a coat of paint or plaster, anoint with salve, ointment or the like. Daplasí sing bárnis ang kwádro. Coat the frame with varnish. Give the frame a coat of varnish. Gindaplasán níya ang íya likód sing búyò. He plastered his back with buyo-leaves. Idáplas iníng pínta sa lamésa. Use this paint to paint the table. Dinaplasán níya ang íya hubág sing támbal. He put a medicinal plaster on his ulcer. Daplasí ang padér sing ápog. White-wash-, lime-wash-, the wall. (see háplas, dámla, pálhit).


hámò

Hiligaynon

To soil, spoil, dirty, defile, tarnish, harm, contaminate (by touch or contact with), make impure, etc. as the food on a plate off which one has eaten. Indì mo paghamóon ang kán-on. Don't touch the rice. Ginhámò níya ang kán-on sa ákon pínggan. He touched the rice on my plate. Indì mo pagihámò ang ímo túdlò sa binahóg. Don't put your finger in the food (mixed on the plate). Iníng dalága nahámò na. This girl has lost her honour. (see hámlò).


hamô

Hiligaynon

Spoilt, impure, tainted, defiled, tarnished, contaminated by touch, etc. Hamô nga pagkáon. Food made impure by having been touched by somebody. Hamô nga babáe. A woman that lost her honour.


kalagô

Hiligaynon

(B) Dirt, dirtiness, filthiness, condition of being dirtied, foul, soiled, tarnished, particularly applied to soiled clothes. (see lagô, lagôlagô).


mahígkò

Hiligaynon

Dirty, tarnished, soiled, stained, sullied, foul, filthy, grimy, mucky, defiled, unclean, impure, obscene. (see hígkò, músing, dágtà, bulíng, lagôlagô).


maputî

Hiligaynon

White, snowy, chalky, hoar, hoary, blanched; pure, unsullied, untarnished, candid, uncontaminated, snow-white. (putî).


paalúm

Hiligaynon

To darken, make dark, blacken, tarnish, dull, make lose whiteness or lustre, applied especially to a metal and to facial expression. Ang túbig nagpaalúm sang íya síngsing, arítos, bórlas, binángon, etc. His (Her) ring, ear-rings, tassels, bolo, etc. became dark or lost their original (lustre) brightness through the action of water. Indì ka magpaalúm sang ímo guyá. Don't look so black (sour, cross). (see alúm, paitúm, pailóm).


táp-ing

Hiligaynon

Dirt, grime, mud, filth, stain, tarnish; to become or make dirty, etc. Walâ gid sing táp-ing ang íya dungúg. His character is perfectly blameless. He is a man of unblemished (irreproachable) character. Ang íya guyá natap-ingán sang hígkò kag dugô. His face was-grimy and blood-stained,-besmeared with grime and blood. Ayáw pagbuháta inâ, kay matap-ingán gid ang maáyo nga ngálan sang ímo panimaláy. For God's sake don't do such a thing, for it will certainly bring dishonour on the fair name of your family (it will discredit-, reflect upon-, your good family-name). (see dágtà, hígkò, bulíng, rísmò).


tap-ingón

Hiligaynon

Dirty, grimy, soiled, sullied, tarnished, having a dirty face, or the like. (see bulingón, mahígkò, rísmò).


tsaról

Hiligaynon

(Sp. charol) Patent leather; Japanese varnish.