Search result(s) - níya

aránka

Hiligaynon

(Sp. arrancar) To attack, particularly applied to sudden or swift aggression. Arankahá siá! Go for him! Attack him. Sang nagatíndog akó dirâ ginaránka akó níya sa walâ sing bisán kon anó nga kabangdánan. When I was standing there he rushed at me and attacked me without any cause whatsoever. Ngáa man nga nagaránka ka sa íya? Why did you so suddenly attack him? (see soróso). In gambling: To take a card and turn it face up.



aráo-aráo

Hiligaynon

Dim. of the foregoing aráo. Si Pédro, kon tigangán mo sing isá ka gántang nga bugás, maúrut níya sang káon.-Aráo-aráo, indî akó magpáti. If you boil a ganta of rice for Peter, he will eat it all up:-Oh! You don't say so! I can't believe it!


ardíl

Hiligaynon

(Sp. ardid) Astuteness, cunning, artifice; a ruse, an astute clever lie, sharp practice, a cunning misleading of others; to play a trick on, to mislead, to contrive by cunning or by clever stratagem. Ginardíl lang níya inâ. He did (said) that only to mislead others. Ardilí siá. Play him a trick, deceive him by a ruse. Iardíl mo sa íya inâ. Play that trick on him.


aróhal

Hiligaynon

(B) A joker, jester, one who talks ridiculous nonsense exciting laughter. Aróhal siá nga táo. He is full of fun. He is a great joker. The verb is inarohál. Nagainarohál siá sa ákon or ginainarohalán níya akó. He is telling me funny stories (recounting some of his jokes to me). (see haróhal id.).


arót

Hiligaynon

(B) Voluble, glib, swift of speech; close, near together; to speak swiftly, volubly, glibly, flippantly, rapidly, to pour out words, talk fast. Arót nga táo. A rapid talker. Arót ang íya hámbal. He talks fast. Nagarót siá sang ininglís. He talked English very fluently. Nagaarót siá sang bisán kon anó ang íya nga ginasúgid. He talks very quickly no matter what he is saying. Ginarót níya ang paghámbal. He (purposely) spoke very fast. N.B. For the verb, inarót is more in use than the simple arót. Nagainarót silá. They are talking very quickly. Ginainarót níla ang íla suguilánon. They are holding an animated conversation. (see garót).


arukahík

Hiligaynon

(B) To volunteer, to do something-of one's own free will,-of one's own accord, to move, stir, work without being told or without waiting for orders. Nagarukahík siá sa pagtígang, bisán walâ pa magabút si nánay níya. She boiled rice without waiting for the arrival of her mother. Akó lang nga isá ang nagaarukahík sa baláy, kay tanán silá nagamalasakít. I alone am up and working in the house, for all the rest are ill. (see matómató).


asíg

Hiligaynon

To despise, abhor, insult grievously, abominate. Sín-o ang nagasíg sa ímo? Who insulted you? Ginaasigán níya ang amó nga batásan. He abominates such habits. (see ngíl-ad, támay, lóod).


asúl

Hiligaynon

(Sp. azul) Blue, azure, sky-blue; to colour or dye blue. Ginasúl níya ang báyò ko. He dyed my jacket blue. Dílì mo pagasulón ang patádyong. Don't dye the skirt blue. Ipaasúl ko iníng kolór nga pinúdpud sa ákon báyò. I will use this dye-powder to dye my jacket blue.


átsi

Hiligaynon

(H) Sneezing, sternutation; to sneeze. Naatsihán níya ang íya pányo. Nangátsi (nagátsi) siá sa íya pányo. He sneezed into his handkerchief. (see pangátsi, bahaón).


áwà

Hiligaynon

Mercy, compassion, pity, commiseration, sympathy; to have compassion, to pity, feel for, have mercy on, be compassionate. Nagakaáwa, akó sa íya. I pity him. Ginakaawáan námon ang maláut níya nga kapaláran. We sympathize with him in his bad luck. Maáwà kitá sa íya! Let us have pity on him! (see ló-oy, mainawáon, maawáon, kaáwà).


awát

Hiligaynon

Occupation, business, engagement, work, anything that detains; to keep busy or engaged, to hinder from doing or attending to something else. May awát akó. I have some task to perform, some work in hand (and, consequently, I beg to be excused). Ginawát akó níya. He kept me occupied, hindered me from attending to something else. Dî mo akó pagawatón. Don't hinder or interrupt me. Iníng trabáho iawát ko sa ímo. I'll give you this work as an interruption to your present engagement. Awatí sing malíp-ot nga tión ang ímong buluhatón. Interrupt for a moment your present occupation. Allow your time to be encroached upon for a while. Awát man lang inâ. That was only an interruption, was of no avail, to no purpose, was a complete failure. Indì ka magkádto dídto, kay awát man lang ang ímo pagkádto. Don't go there, for your going there will be only a waste of time. (see kaawátan, mainawáton, libáng).


awóg

Hiligaynon

A spell or enchantment believed in by the superstitious, and supposed to make one remain within a rather narrow circle, unable to go far away; spell-binding. Also used as a verb. Ginbutangán níya sing awóg ang íya karabáw. He cast a spell on his buffalo (so that the buffalo should not be able to go far astray). Naawogán ang makáwat. The thief had a spell put on him (in order that he should be unable to escape to a place far away). Naawóg siá sang balíkbálik. He is bound to come back again, he is forced to go to and fro, he is, as it were, spell-bound and keeps returning to the same place. (see lúmay, lumáy).


áy-ay

Hiligaynon

To spread out before, show, display. Ginayayán níya akó sang íya bág-o nga huégo. She showed me her new dress. (see ládlad).


ayóp

Hiligaynon

Now and then used instead of paayóp. Ginayóp (ginpaayóp) níya si Fuláno. He-adopted N.N.,-took care of N.N. See the following ayóp.


ayóp

Hiligaynon

One under the care and protection of another, a ward, protegé, one who is given shelter and protection; to seek refuge, look for shelter and protection, seek an asylum, etc., as orphans, or the like. Ayóp níla siá. He is their ward, protegé. Ang mga ímol nagaayóp sa mga manggaránon. The poor look for help to the rich. Paáypa (paayopá) akó, kon mga saráng. Grant me shelter and protection, if possible. Ipaayóp ko sa íya iníng makaloló-oy nga táo. I will give this poor man into his care. Yádtong ílo nga bátà nga ginpaayóp níya ginbílang níya nga sumúod nga anák níya. That orphan boy, whom he had taken pity upon, he treated as if he were his own son. (see aláypan, dangúp).


ayúda

Hiligaynon

(Sp. ayuda, ayudar) Help, aid, succour, assistance; enema, clyster; to help, assist; to administer an enema. Ayudahí siá. Help him. Ginaayudahán níya ang tagumatáyon. She is assisting the dying person (by saying the prayers for the dying, etc.). Notice the accent in the following: Ayudáhi siá. Administer him an enema. (see búlig, tábang, agubáy, kalíya, labatíba).


babáknit

Hiligaynon

Dim. of babáe, but also applied to girls, especially in contempt. Nalágyo ang babáknit sa tápus na níya mapanghabóy ang mga hampángan sang íya mga kaúpud. The naughty girl ran off after throwing away the toys of her companions. (see mabáknit id.).


bábha

Hiligaynon

A large rent or hole, a gaping wound, gash; to make a gash or rent. May bábha ang likód níya, kay ginlabô ni Fuláno. He has a gaping wound on the back, for he received a gash from N.N. Ginbábha níya ang báyò ko. He tore a large hole in my jacket. Ginbabhaán níya ang íya likód. He made a gaping wound in his back. Ibábha sa likód níya ang ímo binángon. Give him a gash on the back with your bolo. (see wáng-wang).


badiáng, bádiang

Hiligaynon

A tropical plant with very large leaves. Daw badiáng ang dulúnggan níya. His ears are as large as badiang leaves, a saying applied to one who likes to be praised.


badíl

Hiligaynon

A fire-arm, musket, rifle; to shoot with a fire-arm; to beat, drub, thrash, strike, swinge. Badilá siá. Shoot him. Give him a thrashing. Ibadíl ang búldok mo. Shoot off your revolver. Ginbadíl níya ang buyóng. He shot the brigand. Dî mo siá pagbadilón sing támà. Don't beat him too much. (see lúthang, lámpus, bálbal, lámba, bákol, badíl is probably derived from the Spanish "barril").


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