Search result(s) - sôsô

sóso

Hiligaynon

The female breast, paps; to suck the breast; pasóso-to give suck, give or offer the breast, to suckle, nurse (feed) a baby. Ang bátà nagasóso sa íya nga ilóy. The baby is sucking its mother's breast. "Buláhan ang tián nga nagdalá sa ímo, kag ang mga dúghan nga ginsós-an (ginsosóhan, ginsóswan) mo". "Blessed is the womb that bore thee, and the paps that gave thee suck". Pasós-a (pasosóha, pasóswa) ang bátà, kay gutúm na. Give the baby-suck,-the breast (Nurse or feed the baby), for it is hungry. (see úbre).



sôsô

Hiligaynon

To squash, squelch, smash, press, compress, squeeze. (see nônô, mômô).


mômô

Hiligaynon

To squeeze, push or press against, as one's head against a wall or floor, etc. (see nônô, sôsô, núsnus, uríud, oróod).


panôsô

Hiligaynon

Freq. of sôsô-to squash, smash, squeeze or beat to pulp.


panóso

Hiligaynon

Dishonesty, cheating; to cheat. (see tóso). Form or shape of the breasts, etc. (see sóso).


pasólok

Hiligaynon

To swell painfully (of breasts containing too much milk, etc.). Nagapasólok ang íya nga sóso. Her breast is swollen with an excess of milk.


pasóso

Hiligaynon

To nurse at the breast, give suck to, suckle. Ang ilóy nagapasóso sang bátà. The mother is giving suck to the baby. Pasós-a (pasóswa, pasosóha) ang bátà. Nurse the baby at the breast. (see pa, sóso).


pasôsô

Hiligaynon

To insist on an answer, ply with repeated questions in order to elicit an answer from one who wants to keep silent. Also: Caus. of sôsô-to press, squeeze, etc.


pétso

Hiligaynon

(Sp. pecho) Thorax, chest; breast. (see dúghan, abá, sóso).


tákmò

Hiligaynon

To suck. Ang bátà nagatákmò sa íya ilóy. The baby is sucking the breast of its mother. Nakatákmò gid lang iníng bátà sing makaisá kag napatáy. This baby sucked milk once and died. (see sópsop, súyup, sóso, yúpyup).


títi

Hiligaynon

(B) títì, (H) (Sp. teta) Mammary gland, teat, nipple, dug; to suck the breast. Ang bátà nagatítì. The baby is sucking the breast. Ambót kon sa diín pa níya titíon (saráng matítì) ang dakû nga pílak nga ginakinahánglan níya. I don't know where he can scrape together (Literally: suck) the large amount of money he stands in need of. (see sóso, ulútngan).


turós

Hiligaynon

To sip, suck, imbibe, absorb, drink in small draughts, draw in with the mouth. Turosá lang ang ítlog sa olokabá. Just suck the egg from its shell. Sín-o ang nagturós sang sabáw? Who has been sipping the sauce? (see hígop, sópsop, súyup, yúpyup, lótgot, sóso).


úbre

Hiligaynon

(Sp. ubre) The udder, dug. Makaúyon ka sang úbre? Do you like to eat the udder (of a cow)? (see sóso).


úbre

Hiligaynon

(Sp. ubre) The udder, dug. Makaúyon ka sang úbre? Do you like to eat the udder (of a cow)? (see sóso).


alinsóso

Hiligaynon

The tender central part or core of the edible marrow of the coconut-and buri-palm (úbud) as well as of the tip of the banana-blossom (úbad). Any similar tender core.


pasosóng-ol

Hiligaynon

See pasúng-ol, pasisíng-al, pasingít.


sosón

Hiligaynon

Group, troop, bunch, drove, party, division. Madámù nga mga sosón nga mga (sang mga) táo ang naglilígad sa ámon baláy. Many groups of people passed by our house. Tan-awá ináng (yanáng) isá ka sosón nga mga (sang mga) karabáw dirâ. Look at that herd of buffaloes over there. (see hubón, búnghay, panóng).


sosoón

Hiligaynon

To cover the head against rain or sun, especially said of women loosening their skirt and putting it over their head. Magsosoón ka lang, kay magaulán. Cover your head (with your skirt), for it is coming on to rain. (see tákdung, kódong, takuróng).


hút-ong

Hiligaynon

A troupe, troop, body, drove, crowd, section, herd, flock, company, bunch. (see hubón, búnghay, sosón, panóng, húgnà).


omóy-ómoy

Hiligaynon

Dim. and Freq. of ómoy and more used than the simple ómoy.

-on, A suffix very frequently used in Visayan to form:

1) adjectives, e.g. kibúlon, kíblon from kíbul; dugoón from dugô, etc. maluyagón from lúyag; matinahúron from táhud, etc. (see ma-, -in-).

2) nouns, e.g. kapisanón from písan; kalaparón from lápad, etc. etc. N.B. The difference between the simple ka-forms and the ka--on-forms lies in this that the former denote abstract nouns and can be used also for the formation of an exclamatory superlative that corresponds in meaning to the English "How--!", whilst the latter denote nouns in the concrete or as applied to a particular case, e.g. Kalápad siníng palangúmhan! How large this farm is! Ang kalaparón siníng palangúmhan kapín sa tátlo ka ektárea. The size (extent) of this farm is more than three hectares. (see ka-, -an).

3) the so-called (future) passive in-on. Generally speaking the passive in-on is used with verbs that denote a direct action on an object, an action that produces some change on, or modifies, the object, e.g. búhat (to make); hímò (to do); hímos (to prepare, get ready); dágdag (to drop, let fall); hákwat (to lift up); útud (to sever); bíal (to split); gulút (to cut); támpà (to slap); súmbag (to box); gísì (to tear); tábug (to drive away), etc. etc. (see -an, i-).

4) In connection with denominations of money-on adds the meaning: of the value of, a coin (banknote, bill, etc.) of the value of, e.g. diesón-a ten-centavo coin; pisitasón-a twenty-centavo piece; pisosón-coin (note) of the value of a peso, etc.


1 2