Search result(s) - unís

ulít

Hiligaynon

To joke, talk playfully, jest, say something sportive or witty; to fool, chaff, quiz, flatter. (see lahóg, unís, íntò, oslít).



uluníson

Hiligaynon

(H) Conceited, one who is amenable to flattery or who likes to be flattered. (see unís, ulutíson, olodóton, hululanúon).


uluníson

Hiligaynon

(H) Conceited, one who is amenable to flattery or who likes to be flattered. (see unís, ulutíson, olodóton, hululanúon).


utís

Hiligaynon

Flattery, fooling; to flatter, fool, wheedle, cajole, coax. Utisá siá. Flatter (fool, humour) him. Persuade (induce) him by flattery. (see odót, unís, íntò, hásò).


utís

Hiligaynon

Flattery, fooling; to flatter, fool, wheedle, cajole, coax. Utisá siá. Flatter (fool, humour) him. Persuade (induce) him by flattery. (see odót, unís, íntò, hásò).


bahunísta

Hiligaynon

(Sp. bajonista) One who plays, or performs on, the bassoon, a bassoonist, bassoon-player.


munisipál

Hiligaynon

(Sp. municipal) Municipal; borough, town (these last used as adjectives). (see banwahánon, binánwa).


munisípyo

Hiligaynon

(Sp. municipio) Town, township, borough, burgh, Municipality; town-council,-hall,-house. (see bánwa).


ántus

Hiligaynon

To bear, suffer, undergo. Magántus ka siní sing mapailúbon. Bear this patiently. Hántì kay ginhímò mo iní, antusá na man ang sílot. Well, as you did it, suffer the punishment now as well. Dì masáysay ang mga kasakít nga ginántus sang Aton Ginóo. The sufferings borne by Our Lord cannot be described. (see batás, agwánta).


ásod

Hiligaynon

To strike in, add a hand to, to do something together with another in quick turns as one helping another to pound rice, workmen felling a tree or trimming wood by alternate blows, etc. Asod without any other qualification mostly means: to help another pound rice by alternate blows of the pestles. Asdi (asódi) si mánang mo. Help your elder sister to pound rice. Asdi si mánong mo sa pagtapás sang káhoy. Help your elder brother to fell the tree (by giving alternate strokes of the axe, now on this side, now on the other side of the tree). Ang pagásod sa pagkánta maláin, sa pagbásbas kag pagbayó maáyo. To strike in after another in singing (out of unison) is bad, but for dressing timber or pounding rice it is the proper or right thing to do. Ginásdan níla nga duhá sang ákig si Fuláno. They, both of them together, vented their anger on N.N.


bádang

Hiligaynon

To practise, inure, train, accustom to, make used to. Nabádang na siá sa pagtabakô, pag-inúm sing bíno, paghámbal sing ininglés, etc. He is now accustomed to smoke, to drink wine, to speak English, etc. Nabadángan ko na iníng lugár, iníng mga buluhatón, etc. I am now used to this place, to this kind of work, etc. Ipabádang mo siá sa pagsáut sa kay Fulána. Let her learn to dance under N.N.'s instruction. Nagsutíl ang bátà, kay walâ sing nabadángan ang pagkastígo sang íya ilóy. The child turned out badly, because her mother had no method in punishing her. (see ánad, hánas).


baká-báka

Hiligaynon

To treat or punish someone, as if he were an ox. Kon magbúhat ka sinâ, bakábakáhon ka ni tátay. If you do that you will be soundly thrashed by Father. (see tarítári, búnal, etc.).


bákbak

Hiligaynon

Also: to beat, drub, give one a hiding, punish severely. (see tarítári, torótóro, bakábáka, búnak, labá, pákas).


banyá-bánya

Hiligaynon

To see-saw, teeter, move or shake up and down, rise and fall, stand up and sit down in quick succession; a punishment meted out to children by making them stand on one leg, cross their arms, etc.


batás

Hiligaynon

To bear, suffer; sustain, tolerate, put up with; stand. Makabatás ka sinâ? Can you stand that? Hántì, kay ginhímò mo inâ, batasá na man ang ígò nga sílot. Very well then, as you have done that, suffer now the fitting punishment. Ginbatás-or-binatás ko ang tanán nga kahuól. I bore all hardships. Indì na akó magbatás sang ínyo paggináhud dirí. I will not put up any longer with the noise you make. (see ántus, íro, agwánta).


bólsa

Hiligaynon

(Sp. bolsa) Purse, burse, pocket, money-bag. Kastígo inâ sa bólsa. That is a drain (lit.: punishment) on the purse. (see pálhuk).


búnak

Hiligaynon

Also: to beat, drub, club, thrash, punish severely. (see bákbak, tarítári, etc.).


dáwat

Hiligaynon

To accept or receive something from the hand of another. Dawáta iní, kay ginadóhol ko sa ímo. Accept this, for I am offering it to you. Take this, as I am holding it out to you. (N. B. dáwat has often also the meaning of receiving something unpleasant or injurious, to get it, catch it. Nakadáwat siá sang sílot, balatían, kárà, etc. He was punished, contracted a disease, got a scolding, etc.). (see dáwhat, dawô).


dokól

Hiligaynon

To knuckle, strike-, push-, jerk-, punish-, with the knuckles. Dokolá siá. Knuckle him. Dokolí siá sa íya tangkúgò. Knuckle him on the nape of his neck. Andam ka, kay kon íya ikáw makítà dokolón ka gid níya. Be on your guard, for if he sees you, he will knuckle you.


dungán, dúngan

Hiligaynon

To be or do together or at the same time, be coeval or concomitant, do simultaneously or in concert, perform in unison, to synchronize. Nagadungán silá sa pagbúthò. They are going to school together. Gindungán silá sang trankáso. They had influenza at the same time. Dunganá nínyo ang kalabása kag lángkà sa paglúnud sa kólon. Put the squash and jackfruit into the kettle together. Dunganán ta ang bató sa paghákwat. Let us lift the stone all together. Dunganón ta ang paghákwat sang bató. Let us raise the stone in unison, like one man. Dunganón nínyo ang pagbángon sa buás sa pagarádo. Rise together to-morrow morning for the ploughing. (see dungán, kadúngan).


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