Search result(s) - balatían

balatían

Hiligaynon

Disease, illness, sickness, infirmity, ailment, complaint, disorder, malady, distemper, morbid condition. (see bátì).



balatián

Hiligaynon

To have a disease, be-sick,-ill,-infirm,-unwell,-indisposed. Ang mga nagabalatián. Those that are sick, the infirm, sick people.


abút-ábut

Hiligaynon

Freq. of ábut. To come and go, pass off and on; to come within reach, to reach nearly, but not quite. Nagaabút-ábut sa íya ang balatían. The disease attacks him periodically or in frequent fits. Ang kánding ginaabút-ábut na sang idô nga nagalagás. The goat is being nearly caught up to by the pursuing dog. Ang tá-ub nagaabút-ábut dirí siníng baybáyon túbtub sa tungâtúngà sinâ nga búgsok. The high tide on this beach usually rises to about the middle of that post.


agíl-agíl

Hiligaynon

Stunted in growth, undersized, lean and weak; to become stunted, etc. Agíl-agíl nga táo. An undersized person. Nagagíl-agíl siá sa balatían. He became stunted through illness. (see arí-arí).


alantúson

Hiligaynon

(H) Bearable, tolerable, supportable; to be suffered, tolerated, borne with. Dáw sa dílì na alantúson inâ. That is scarcely to be tolerated any longer. Ang íya balatían makúlì nga búlngon, ápang alantúson, kay dílì gid man mabúg-at ang íya pagbátì. His disease is difficult to cure, but it is bearable, for he is really not seriously affected. (see ántus, balatasón, palas-ánon).


áloy

Hiligaynon

A pretended sickness; to feign sickness, pretend to be ill, to malinger, simulate some illness. Aloy lang ináng íya balatían. That sickness of his is a mere imposture or sham. Indì ka magáloy. Don't pretend to be sick. Gináloy lang níya ináng balatían. He merely simulated that disease. Iáloy mo lang nga masakít ang úlo mo. Simply pretend to have a headache.


alugáynay

Hiligaynon

Slow, gentle, soft, mild, not quick, not impetuous, not impulsive; chronic, not acute (of disease); to be or become slow, gentle, mild. Ang mga balatían nga alugáynay. Chronic diseases. Nahúlug siá sa bintánà, ápang walâ siá masamári, kay nagalugáynay ang pagtupâ níya sa dútà nga mahómok. He fell out of the window, but was not hurt, for his fall was soft on the loose earth. Alugáynay gid lámang ang íya nga pagpangítà sing kabuhián. He earns his livelihood with difficulty. His earnings are coming in but slowly. (see ananáy, inanáy, hínay, nagáynay).


amoyóng

Hiligaynon

(B) To stay, live, take up one's abode. Nagaamoyóng silá sa umá. They are living at their farm. Ipaamoyóng ko ang ákon masakít nga bátà sa ínyo baláy sa umá, agúd magáyo ang íya balatían. I'll let my sick child stay with you at the farm, in order that it may recover from its sickness. Ang ámon baláy amô ang naamoyongán sang pilasón. Our house it was in which the wounded man took up his abode. Paamoyongá iníng makaloló-oy nga babáe sa ímo baláy. Allow this poor woman to stay at your house. (see lúntad, puyô).


apíke

Hiligaynon

(Sp. a pique) On the point of, impossible for lack of time or opportunity, too late, past mending, etc. Indì na akó makahingágaw sa pagtahî sang ímo báyò, kay apíke na. I cannot finish sewing your jacket, because there is not time enough. Daw sa dílì na makitáan sing bulúng ang íya balatían, kay apíke na ang íya pagbátì. It is now almost impossible to cure him, for his disease is too far gone.


áyo

Hiligaynon

(H) To be or get well, recover, to get cured or healed; to mend, emend, amend, improve, make good or better. Ang masakít nga bátà nagáyo na. The sick child is cured or has recovered. Iníng bulúng nagpaáyo sang íyang balatían. This medicine cured his sickness. Ayóha ang ímo mga batásan. Mend your manners. Improve your behaviour. Gináyo siá sang manogbúlong. The doctor cured him. Kaáyo-to mend, repair. Kaayóha iní. Repair this. Mend this. Sín-o ang nagkaáyo sang ímo baláy? Who repaired your house?


bíknoli

Hiligaynon

To move about, be up and busy, to be stirring, to stir one self, to be active. Indì na siá makabíknol. He cannot move about any more, he is unable to do any work. Hálus na gánì siá makabíknol gíkan sa kabúdlay, balatían, katigulangón, etc. He can scarcely move any longer on account of being tired, sick, old, etc. Makabíknol pa siá maglágaw?-Indì na gid; pirme lang siá nagahígdà. Can he still walk about? Not at all; he is bed-ridden. (see tíknol, túknul).


buháy-búhay

Hiligaynon

(B) Dim. of búhay. A rather long time, during a considerable space of time. Buháybúhay ang paghulát níya túbtub nga nadángat níya inâ nga palangakóan. He had to wait quite a long time before he got that position. Buháybúhay ang íya pagántos sang balatían. He had to suffer from the disease a considerable time. (see dugáydúgay).


bulúng

Hiligaynon

Medicine, physic, simple, drug, potion, draught, treatment, nostrum, remedy for a wound or disease; to doctor, heal, physic, cure, apply a remedy, treat a patient, give medicine. May bulúng ikáw sa pilás? Have you a remedy for a wound? Ibulúng mo sa íya iníng ilímnon. Give this draught to him as a remedy. Búlnga siá. Give him medicine. Heal him. Treat him. Mapabulúng siá sa Ilóngílong. He is going to see a doctor-or-to get treatment in Iloilo. Ipabulúng ko siá sa hospitál. I shall send him for treatment to the hospital. Sín-o ang nagabulúng sa íya? Who is treating him? Sa tanán nga mga balatían may bulúng, ápang sa kamatáyón walâ. For all bodily ills there is a remedy, but none for death. (Pamulúng-the Freq. of bulúng).


dagíng

Hiligaynon

To improve, pull through, come round, get well, get better, heal, said of a wound or a disease. Nagdagíng ang íya pilás, balatían, etc. His wound got better, his sickness left him, he got over his sickness.


dákdak

Hiligaynon

To provide amply with, give much or plenty of anything. Dakdakí siá sing mga pagkáon. Give him plenty to eat. Dinakdakán akó níya sing láygay. He gave me a long instruction, a lengthy harangue, a long admonition. Indì mo siá pagdakdakán sing trabáho, kay bág-o pa lang siá nagáyo sa balatían kag malúya pa siá. Don't give him much work to do, for he has only just recovered from a sickness and is still weak. Idákdak lang sa íya iníng mga buluhatón. Simply let him tackle these jobs. Keep him busy working at these jobs.


darabáhan

Hiligaynon

Uneasy, worried, fluttered, nervous, anxious, disturbed, having misgivings or apprehensions. Also verb. Darabáhan siá (nagadarabáhan siá) tungúd sang balatían sang íya amáy. He is worried over the sickness of his father. Darabáhan (ginadarabáhan siá) sináng tabû. He is made uneasy by that event. (see darába, dalamúnon, darámnon, índì, malibútay, etc.).


dáwat

Hiligaynon

To accept or receive something from the hand of another. Dawáta iní, kay ginadóhol ko sa ímo. Accept this, for I am offering it to you. Take this, as I am holding it out to you. (N. B. dáwat has often also the meaning of receiving something unpleasant or injurious, to get it, catch it. Nakadáwat siá sang sílot, balatían, kárà, etc. He was punished, contracted a disease, got a scolding, etc.). (see dáwhat, dawô).


depékto

Hiligaynon

(Sp. defecto) Defect, imperfection, blemish, fault. (see samád, kasamarán, kakulángan, sayúp, salâ, balatían, torák, kinaláin).


dugíng

Hiligaynon

To be close by, attached to, alongside of, joined to. Ang íya kasubô kag kaimolón dinugingá (nadugingán) pa sing balatían. To her trouble and poverty there was added illness. (see íping, dulúg, doróg, dúgang).


duhô

Hiligaynon

Very weak, in a state of collapse, almost collapsing from debility; to languish, decline, fail in strength, become frail, weak. Duhô siá. He is very weak. Nagduhô siá, kay nagági sa balatían. He became very weak, for he had been through an illness. (see lúya, lumíng).


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