Search result(s) - kalámay

kalámay

Hiligaynon

Sugar.



kalamáy

Hiligaynon

To sugar, to flatter, to "soft soap". Indì mo siá pagkalamayón. Don't flatter him. Ginkalamáy níla siá. They flattered him-or-They "soft-soaped" him. (see unís, utís, odót, paayónáyon).


alamagán

Hiligaynon

(H) Attractive, having an attraction, alluring, enticing. Ang kalámay alamagán sang mga subáy. Sugar is an attraction for ants. (amág).


alamagón

Hiligaynon

(H) Attracted, allured, enticed; to be allured or enticed, etc. Ang mga subáy alamagón sang kalámay. Ants are attracted by sugar. (see amág).


amát-ámat

Hiligaynon

Little by little, step by step; to do slowly, gradually, leisurely, etc. Nagpadásig balá kamó sang ínyo paglakát?-Walâ, kóndì amát-ámat lang. Did you walk quickly?-No, quite slowly. Amát-amáton nínyo ang pagarádo. Plough slowly, little by little. Naamát-amátan gid námon sa pagbakál ang kalámay. We bought sugar only in small quantities at a time.


ápol

Hiligaynon

To swarm, cluster, mass, to be thick, dense, close together, hang together in clusters. Nagaápol gid lang ang mga lásgà sa kalámay. The sugar is swarming with red ants. Red ants have invaded the sugar. A mass of red ants are attacking the sugar. Nagalápol gid ang mga búnga siníng lúmboy. The fruit of this lumboy-tree grows in dense clusters.


arníbal

Hiligaynon

(Sp. almibar) Thin, freely-flowing molasses in the initial stage of the process of sugar-milling. 1.) inutús-the watery juice squeezed out of the sugar-cane. 2.) arníbal-very thin molasses containing much water. 3.) lasáw-thickening molasses, syrup of the consistency of light honey. 4.) pulút-thick molasses nearing the stage of crystallization or hardening. The pulút, very sticky and viscous, is taken from the cauldron and put into troughs, where by cooling and stirring it slowly hardens or crystallizes to the finished, but unrefined, product of sugar. This last stage of the process of sugar-milling is called "pagasúkar sang pulút"-"to turn the pulút into sugar". See under asúkar. 5.) asúkar, kalámay-sugar.


asúkar

Hiligaynon

(Sp. azucar) Sugar; to make sugar including all the operations in the final stage of the process of sugar-milling, transferring the pulút (the sugar-cane-juice that has become thick and sticky through evaporation) from the cauldron to a flat-bottomed trough and stirring it there with special shovels, till ready for drying and packing. Asukára na lang ang pulút. Turn the pulút into sugar. Asukári akó sing isá ka káwà nga pulút sa madalì, kay may kinahánglan akó sinâ. Turn me a cauldronful of pulút into sugar at once, for I need it. Iasúkar akó ánay siníng pulút. Please turn this pulút into sugar for me. (see arníbal, kalámay).


bágtik

Hiligaynon

To harden and get brittle, as dry mud and the like. Nagbágtik ang lúnang. The mud has hardened. Nabagtikán sía sing lúnang sa íya mga panápton. Some mud got dry and hard on his clothes. Nagbágtik ang kalámay sa kaláhà. The sugar in the pan is overdone i.e. has dried and hardened to the point of emitting a smell of scorching or burning.


bakíntol

Hiligaynon

(B) To carry, bear on one's shoulders or on the hip. Bakintolá iníng bayóong nga kalámay. Carry this sack of sugar. (see dalá, pás-an, tíbong, abága).


diín

Hiligaynon

Where? There, where --. Which of --? Diín ka makádto? Where are you going,-going to? Diín ka magkádto? Where did you go to? Where have you been? Diín ang baláy mo? Where is your home? Sa bisán diín. Anywhere, in any place. Bákli akó sing limá ka abáno sa bisán diín nga ginabaligyaán. Buy me five cigars at any shop. Kon sa diín ang kalámay magatilípon ang mga subáy. Where there is sugar, ants will gather. Sa mánggad kag dungúg, diín ang ímo anóhon? Between wealth and honour, what will you choose? Diín na ang ákon kálò? Where is my hat? Diín na (dín-a) siá? Where is he now? Ang panimaláy nga sa diín nagahárì ang paghidáit --. The household or family in which (where) peace reigns --. Diín siníng duhá ka balítà ang matúod? Which of the two reports is true? Diín siníng duhá ka butáng ang dápat ko pagpasulabíhon? Which of these two things should I prefer?


dimól

Hiligaynon

To taste, experience, profit from, get or receive a benefit or advantage. Walâ gid akó makadimól sang pinatubás námon, kay ginbáyad gid lámang sa ákon útang. I have not derived any advantage from our harvest, because it has all gone towards paying my debt. Walâ gid akó kadimól sang ímo kwárta, kán-on, kalámay, etc. I never had the least benefit from your money, rice, sugar, etc. Your money, etc. never did me any good. I never profited by your money, etc. i.e. you never gave me any money, rice, sugar, etc. (see dímdim, tiláw, pulús).


diótay

Hiligaynon

(H) A little, trifle, morsel, snack; small, little, tiny, wee, scant, meagre, bit, petty, diminutive, few; to diminish, decrease, lessen, be or become small, etc. Nagdiótay iníng bánwa. This town has become small. Diotáya ang pagbutáng sing kalámay sa kapé. Put only a little sugar into the coffee. Diótay man lang ang mga táo nga nagtalámbong. There were only a few people in attendance. Diótay nga butáng. A small, trifling or unimportant matter. Diótay nga táo. A small or uninfluential man. Diótay na lang --. Almost, nearly, close upon, well nigh, all but --. Nadiotáyan gid lang siá (sa paghulúg) nga mahúlug sa busáy. He nearly fell into the abyss. Gindiótay níla ang baláy. They made the house smaller. Ginpakadiótay níla inâ. They made light of it. They considered it a trivial matter. (see dítik, diót, dítay, díting, gamáy, tikî, isót).


dulít

Hiligaynon

Black and sticky, dark and wet, especially said of low grade cane-sugar or third and fourth class muscovado. Dulít nga kalámay. Dark-coloured and sticky cane-sugar. Also used as a verb. Indì mo pagdulitón sa isá ka túig ang ímo kalámay. Don't produce low-grade sugar next year.


empáke

Hiligaynon

(Sp. empaque) Packing; to pack. Empakéha ang kalámay. Pack the sugar. Iempáke iníng mga bayóong sa kalámay. Use these sacks of matting to pack the sugar in. (see putús, baláhos, bágtong).


empáke

Hiligaynon

(Sp. empaque) Packing; to pack. Empakéha ang kalámay. Pack the sugar. Iempáke iníng mga bayóong sa kalámay. Use these sacks of matting to pack the sugar in. (see putús, baláhos, bágtong).


hág-on

Hiligaynon

To buy up, buy wholesale, contract for all that is for sale. Ginhág-on ko ang íya ságing. I bought up his bananas. Ginhag-onán ko siá sang tanán níya nga ságing. I made a contract with him for all his bananas. Ihág-on akó sang íya kamóti. Kindly buy up for me his sweet potatoes. Ipahág-on mo sa ákon ang ímo kalámay, índì mo ánay pagibalígyà sa ibán. Let me have all your sugar; don't sell it to others. (see ságib).


háon

Hiligaynon

A vat-full or cualdron-full of sugar; the last stage of sugar-milling; to stir, mix, move about with shovels, etc. the nearly finished product of sugar-milling. Haóna ang kalámay. Stir the sugar (in the vat, cualdron or tub). Haóni akó sing isá ka háon nga kalámay. Get ready for me one vat-full of sugar.


hohô

Hiligaynon

To shake empty, shake and pour out the contents of a sack or the like. Ihohô ang sáko. Shake out the contents of the sack. Hohoá ang kalámay sa bayóong. Pour the sugar out of the bag. Hohoí akó sing isá ka gántang nga humáy sa ság-ub. Pour me out one ganta of rice from the bamboo-receptacle. Ginhohó níya ang taón kag naggwâ ang mga katáng, uláng kag ísdà nga magamáy. He shook the small fish-trap and crabs, shrimps and small fish fell out.


hón-og

Hiligaynon

Wet, soaked, moist, impregnated, soggy, sodden; to wet, soak, etc., said especially of things liable to melt or dissolve. Ang asín, kalámay nagpahón-og sa sáko. The salt, sugar moistened the sack. Ang bayóong ginhon-ogán sang muskobádo. The bag was impregnated with muscovado (unrefined sugar). (see hún-og id.).


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