Search result(s) - manók

manók

Hiligaynon

Fowl, chicken; cock, gamecock; poultry. (see agák, sulúg, mungâ, pisô, sumaláyhaw, kilawát, dumalága, damulága).



abá

Hiligaynon

(B) The back, shoulder-blades, scapula; the breast of a bird, especially of a fowl; to carry on the back, put on the back. Ibutáng mo iníng bayóong sa abá sang karabáw. Put this bag on the buffalo's back. Toktoká ang abá sang manók. Chop up the breast of the chicken. Ginpaabá akó níya sa pagtabók sa subâ. He carried me on his back across the river. Paábhan mo siá. Get hold of his back. Grasp him behind by the shoulders. (see likód, talúdtud, dúghan, pétso, tíbong, patíbong).


abohón

Hiligaynon

Ashy, full of-, covered with-, ashes. Abáw, abohón gid ang ólo mo. Oh, your head is covered with-, full of-, ashes. Ang manók nga abohón amó ang nagítlog. The grey hen is the one that laid the egg.


agák

Hiligaynon

Cock, rooster. (see sulúg, manók, sumaláyhaw-a young cock).


áka

Hiligaynon

To sell well, be much in demand, be much sought after. Nagáka karón sa Ilongílong ang páhò, ságing, ísdà kag manók. At present mangoes, bananas, fish and chickens are much in demand in Iloilo. Sang túig nga tinalíkdan maíwat ang pamaligyáon sang sibúkaw, ápang nián nagáka na. Last year the market for sibúkaw-wood was dull, stagnant, but now it is much in demand. (see maáka, kaáka, mabákal, bákal, ágaw, dásà).


ál-al

Hiligaynon

To get loose, to peel or scale off, as a piece of bark, skin, flesh, etc. Nagál-al na ang kogán sang ákon butí. The scabs of my smallpox have now fallen off. Lauyáha ang kárne túbtub nga magál-al sa túl-an. Boil the meat till it comes loose from the bone. Al-alá or paal-alá ang pánit sang manók. Boil the chicken till the skin comes away.


alasálon

Hiligaynon

(H) Fit for roasting or that is to be roasted on a spit. Kárne, manók, báboy, etc. nga alasálon. Meat, chicken, pork, etc. that is to be roasted on a spit. (see asál, alasálan).


alátay

Hiligaynon

A disease manifesting itself by trembling and great dizzines; chickens are particularly liable to, and often die of, this disease. May alátay or ginaalátay ang manók. The chicken has been,-is attacked by alátay. Also: a swelling and inflammation of the eyelids. (see arátay id.).


asál

Hiligaynon

(Sp. asar) To roast, particularly to roast on a spit. Asalá ang manók. Roast the chicken. Inasál nga manók. Roast chicken. Asalí ang masakít sing manók. Roast a chicken for the sick person. Iasál akó ánay siníng manók. Please roast this chicken for me.


asín

Hiligaynon

Salt; to salt. Asiní ang ísdà. Salt the fish. Iasín iníng púdyot nga asín sa manók. Season the chicken with these few grains of salt.


áslum

Hiligaynon

Sourness, bitterness, sharpness, tartness, acidity; to be or become sour, to sour, make sour. Nagáslum ang bíno. The wine has gone sour. Iníng búnga walâ gid sing áslum. This fruit has no tartness at all. Aslumí ang manók, ápang dílì mo pagaslumón. Mix something sour with the chicken, but do not make it quite sharp. Pagapaaslumón ko gid iníng diótay nga tubâ, kay buháton ko nga lebadúra. I will let this little palm-wine get sour, for I am going to make yeast of it. Iníng isá ka kutsára nga lánggaw iáslum ko sa ísdà. I will season the fish with this spoonful of vinegar.


babáylan

Hiligaynon

Sorcerer, wizard, magician, one versed in superstitious practices. Also used as a verb. Ginbabaylanán sang babáylan ang masakít nga bátà. The sorcerer practised his art or performed his enchantments over the sick child. Ginpababaylanán sang ilóy ang íya masakít nga bátà. The mother got a conjurer to perform his superstitious rites over her sick baby. Ang babáylan kon magbinabáylan maíhaw sing manók ukón báboy kag mapatíkpátik sa pínggan. When the conjurer performs his superstitious rites he kills a chicken or pig and repeatedly strikes a plate. Nakakáon siá sing báboy nga binabaylanán. He ate some pork that had been subjected to superstitious rites.


bakól

Hiligaynon

To stew, to cook in a bamboo-joint, especially poultry, with various ingredients. Bakolá ang manók. Stew the chicken in a bamboo-joint. Bakolí akó sing manók. Stew a chicken or me. Ibakól akó ánay siníng manók. Please, stew this chicken for me. Kinawátan siá níla sang íya bálon nga binakól. They stole his stewed chicken, which he had brought with him as provision on his trip.


balakolón

Hiligaynon

(H) To be stewed or fit for stewing. Manók nga balakolón. A chicken to be stewed (usually in a bamboo-joint). (see bakól).


bás-o

Hiligaynon

Hash; minced-meat,-fish,-vegetables; to mince, hash, chop up. Basohá ang manók. Chop up the chicken. Bas-ohí akó sing manók. Chop up a chicken for me. Ipabás-o ko iní sa ímo. I'll let you make hash of this. Kaúyon ikáw sang báboy nga binás-o? Do you like minced pork? (see tóktok).


basâ

Hiligaynon

Moisture, humidity, dankness, damp, dampness, wet, wetness; moist, damp, wet, soaked, dank, humid; to make or become wet, to drench, etc. Nabasâ ang ákon tiíl. My foot got wet. Ginbasâ níya ang ákon pányo. He made my handkerchief wet. Bás-a ang lampáso. Soak the mop in water. Bás-i ang ití sang manók sa salúg. Clean up with water the chicken-dung on the floor. Pahíran mo lang ang lamésa sing trápo nga mamalá, dílì mo pagbás-on. Just wipe the table with a dry cloth, don't use water. Binás-an níya ang íya kamút sing agás, agúd makúhà ang dágtà sang pínta. He wetted his hand with petroleum, in order to get out the paint-stains. Likawí ang ulán, agúd dílì ka mabasâ kag mapásmo. Avoid the rain, lest you should get wet and catch a cold. Ang hubág níya nga maáyo na gid nagbasâ na man. His ulcer that was quite healed before is now suppurating (wet) again. Nagbasâ na man ang mga matá sang ilóy sang pagkabatî níya nga may nagsámbit sang ngálan sang íya anák nga bág-o lang napatáy. The mother's eyes became wet (filled with tears), when she heard someone mentioning the name of her child that had recently died. Kánding nga binasâ (nabasâ) sang ulán. A goat that has been drenched by rain. (see malá-to be dry, etc.).


bíkat

Hiligaynon

To open-, force-, press-, asunder, tear or pull apart (a purse or the like). Bikáta ang tinápay. Pull the loaf asunder. Ibíkat akó ánay sang ákon bólsa, kay akó índì makabíkat sinâ. Kindly open my purse for me, as I cannot force it open. Bikáta akó sang pológwan, kay pasúdlon ko ang manók. Open the mouth of the chicken-basket for me, for I am going to put in the cock. (see bílad, húmlad-to open, unfold).


bilíbod

Hiligaynon

To sprinkle, strew, scatter, as grain, flowers or the like. Bilibóri (-ódi) ang manók sing humáy. Scatter some rice-grains to the chickens. Ibilíbod sa mungâ ang isá ka púdyot nga maís. Scatter a little corn for the hen. Binilibóran níla ang laráwan sang Mahál nga Bírhen sing madámù nga mga búlak. They strewed the statue of the Blessed Virgin with many flowers. (see bóbod, sábwag, waráwag, sábud, sáb-og).


binó

Hiligaynon

To stew inside a closed receptacle surrounded by water in such a way, that no water comes in contact with what is being stewed. Binohá lang ang paglútò sang manók. Stew the chicken. (see bakól with the difference that in bakól water comes in contact with what is being stewed).


bóbod

Hiligaynon

To scatter-, strew-, throw-, grain or the like to chickens, etc. Bobóri (-ódi) ang manók. Scatter some food for the chickens. Binobóran ko ang manók sing diótay nga humáy. I threw a little rice to the chickens. (búbud id.).


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