Search result(s) - tínda

tínda

Hiligaynon

Market, shop, etc. See tiénda.



panindáhan

Hiligaynon

To go to market, visit a market in order to buy or sell. Manindáhan (mapanindáhan, magapanindáhan) pa kitá ánay sing diótay nga tión kag ugáling mapaúlì. We shall first go to the market for a moment and then return home. (see tínda, tiénda, tindáhan).


tiénda

Hiligaynon

(Sp. tienda) Shop, stall, booth, store, warehouse, emporium; market, market-place. (see balaligyáan, almasín, tiánggi, talangwáyan, tínda, tindáhan).


údal

Hiligaynon

To abate, diminish, slacken, languish, flag, dwindle, decrease, have the edge taken off, to blunt, dull. Walâ pa pagúdal ang pamaligyáon sa tínda (tiénda). Selling at the market is quite brisk still (has not slackened, grown dull, fallen off). Walâ pagúdal ang íya pamatásan. His habits are firmly rooted, difficult to reform or to eradicate. Indì mo pagudálon ang binángon. Don't blunt the bolo. (see búhin, hábul, hídal, hádal).


údal

Hiligaynon

To abate, diminish, slacken, languish, flag, dwindle, decrease, have the edge taken off, to blunt, dull. Walâ pa pagúdal ang pamaligyáon sa tínda (tiénda). Selling at the market is quite brisk still (has not slackened, grown dull, fallen off). Walâ pagúdal ang íya pamatásan. His habits are firmly rooted, difficult to reform or to eradicate. Indì mo pagudálon ang binángon. Don't blunt the bolo. (see búhin, hábul, hídal, hádal).


tindáhan

Hiligaynon

Market, market-place, etc. See tiénda.


tíndak

Hiligaynon

A kick, blow (thrust, violent hit) with the foot or feet; to kick. Tinindakán siá sang kabáyo. He received a kick from the horse. Indì mo siá pagtindakán. Don't kick him. (see sípà).


tínday

Hiligaynon

The young of large domestic animals, as the calf of a cow, the foal of a mare, the lamb of an ewe, the kid of a goat (but not of pigs or dogs). (see totóy-a young dog; orók, idík-a young pig).


ánggot

Hiligaynon

To get used to take proper food, to get a liking for, or to relish, proper food, applied especially to a baby or to a young animal just weaned. Sang úna iníng tínday nagdolodámgot (nagdolodánggot) lang sang hilamón, ápang karón nagánggot na sa halálbon. Formerly this calf used only to nibble at the grass, but now it is beginning to graze. Bisán lutasón na iníng bátà, kay maánggot na sa pagkáon sing kán-on. There is no harm now in weaning this baby, because it already likes to eat rice.


báka

Hiligaynon

(Sp. vaca) Cow, ox, cattle. Báka nga gatasán. A milch cow. (see tóro-bull, steer; tínday-calf).


bálio

Hiligaynon

(B) To barter, exchange, swap, swop. Ginbaliohán ko ang ákon karabáw sang isá ka báka. I exchanged my buffalo for a cow. Baliohán ko ang ákon kálò sang ímo líbro or Ibálio ko ang ákon kálò sa ímo líbro. I will exchange my hat for your book. Ginbálio níya ang íya báboy sa ákon tínday. He swapped his pig for my calf. (see báilo, báylo, bályo).


barôrô

Hiligaynon

Bent, crooked, twisted, huddled up; to bend, curve, wriggle, writhe, wince, squirm, huddle up, cringe, crouch, fall down in a heap. Nagbarôrô siá sa salúg tungúd sang mabáskug nga tíndak nga íya nabáton. He fell down in a heap on the floor from the violent kick. (see sikrotót, bulídbulíd, ligídligíd, singkorót, singkayóng).


dámgot

Hiligaynon

To begin to eat or graze, start taking other food than milk, said of a baby and of a young animal. Nagadámgot na ang bátà, tínday. The baby, the calf, is now commencing to take other food than milk. (see lánggot).


gáab

Hiligaynon

To low, bellow, moo (of cattle); to weep, cry, blubber. Ginagaában sang báka ang íya nga tínday nga naíhaw. The cow is lowing mournfully for her calf that was slaughtered. A, iníng bátà dáyon gid lang nagagáab. Why, this baby is constantly crying. Indì mo akó paggaában kon mamatáy akó. Don't weep for me when I die. Pagaába ang bátà, agúd makabatî ang íya nga íloy kag magpaúlì sa madalî. Make the baby cry so that its mother may hear it and come home at once. Pagaába lang ang bátà túbtub kon sán-o matápus ang íya hilibíon. Just let the baby have its cry out. Hípus ka lang, índì ka maggáab. Be quiet, don't cry. Anó na man ang ginagáab-or-ginagaában mo? What are you weeping for this time? (see hibî, tángis, hibubún-ot, gáab is properly used in connection with an animal, and the word sounds rather rough and impolite when used in connection with a human being, though colloquially it is often employed).


hánggud

Hiligaynon

(B) Large, tall, big, huge, vast, sizable, ample, spacious, capacious, voluminous, bulky, massive, massy, great; to be or become large, etc. Naghánggud na ang tínday sang karabáw. The calf of the buffalo has grown big. Hanggudá ang ákon báhin, ang búslot, etc. Give me a large share, make a wide hole, etc. Pahanggudá ang báboy kag ibalígyà mo kon hánggud na. Let the pig get big and sell it when it is full-grown. Ipahánggud ko sa ímo iníng tínday. I'll give you this calf to rear. Hánggud nga baláy, táo, bató, etc. A large house, man, stone, etc. (see dakû, mabahól, matáas, malápad, hanáhay).


hiringítyon

Hiligaynon

(B) The last of a series, end, termination, finishing stroke or touch. Amó iní ang hiringítyon nga tínday siníng matsóra. This is the last calf of this old cow. (see ití, hiringítyon literally means the last portion emitted by a hen evacuating her bowels; kinágut).


humá

Hiligaynon

(B) To low, moo; lowing (of cattle). Ang báka nagahumá, ang karabáw nagaingâ. The cow moos, the buffalo bleats. Ginahumahán sang báka ang íya nga tínday. The cow is lowing for her calf. (see umá, mámá, ).


ingâ

Hiligaynon

The bellow, roar, bleat; to bellow, roar, bleat (of a buffalo). Ginaingaán sang karabáw ang íya nga tínday. The buffalo is bleating (roaring) for its calf.


ingâ

Hiligaynon

The bellow, roar, bleat; to bellow, roar, bleat (of a buffalo). Ginaingaán sang karabáw ang íya nga tínday. The buffalo is bleating (roaring) for its calf.


kámbang

Hiligaynon

Variegated, motley, marked with various colours, spotted, dapple, dappled, mottled, brindled; to be or become variegated, etc. Ang tínday nagkámbang na. The calf has become spotted. (see bolók, pintókpíntok: the difference is that "kámbang" is used of variously coloured surfaces with spots of a larger size than implied by "bolók" or "pintókpíntok").


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