Search result(s) - bató

ramúsot

Hiligaynon

(B) To crush to pulp, squash, squelch; to be pressed or crushed to pulp. Nalapákan ang ságing kag naramúsot. The banana was trodden upon and crushed. Ang pángkà maramúsot (Ang pakâ malamúsut) kon igóon mo siníng bató. The frog will be squashed, if you hit it with this stone. Indì mo pagparamusóton (pagpalamusóton) ang mga páhò. Don't crush the mangoes. Ang manók nalígsà sang áwto kag naramúsot (nalamúsut). The chicken was run over by the automobile and crushed. (see pusâ, lumâ, báak, bókbok, etc. N.B. ramúsot, (lamúsut) implies that the crushing results in a pulpy formless mass and can consequently not be used of dry objects or things that merely crumble under pressure). (see lamúsut).



sagáng

Hiligaynon

To prevent, stop, forestall, keep off, stave off, forefend, fend off, ward off, parry a blow, hinder something from falling, etc. Sagangá ang íya binángon. Parry the blow from his bolo. Sagangá ang masakít, agúd índì matúmba. Save the sick man from falling to the ground. Ginsagáng níya sa ígò gid nga tión ang pagkahúlug sang bató. In the nick of time he kept the stone from falling. Isagáng sa túbig ang isá ka púnud. Stop the water by a dam. Keep the water back (Stem the water) by building a dyke.


sálwan

Hiligaynon

To be hit accidentally. Andam ka, kay básì masálwan ka sang binángon, bató, bóla, etc. Look out, for you may be hit by the bolo, stone, ball, etc. (see salô).


sándad

Hiligaynon

To knock or stumble against, to stub one's toe against, to kick against, trip over, make a false step. Nakasándad akó sa bató. I struck my foot-, I stumbled-, against a stone. Nasándad ko ang kólon. I stumbled against the rice-pot. Andam ka, kay mabúung ang bangâ kon masándad mo. Be careful, for the water-jar will break in pieces, if you trip over it or knock against it.


sángkay

Hiligaynon

To throw a stone, ball, etc. as in the game of skittles, marbles and the like (in order to hit, knock out or scatter). Sangkayá ang bató. Throw the stone. Sangkayí ang ákon dalógdog. Have a throw at my dalógdog-nut.


síbò

Hiligaynon

Fit, suited, correct, exact; to fit, suit, go-, accord-, match-, with. Síbò gid ang íya (panabát) sabát. His answer was quite correct. Síbò gid ang ímo báyò sa ímo delárgo. Your jacket goes well with your trousers. Iníng lánsang índì makasíbò; dálhi akó sing dakû. This nail won't do; bring me a large one. Pasibóa ang bató sa búhò sang padér. Fit the stone into the hole in the wall. (see ígò, ángay).


sig-angón

Hiligaynon

Fit for, or pertaining to, a tripod. Bató nga sig-angón. One of the three stones of a stone tripod as used on open hearths (for supporting a pot, etc.).


Thud, thump, dump; to thud, thump, dump, land with a thud or thump (of falling objects). Nagsigábung ang bató sa pagtupâ sa busáy. The stone landed at the bottom of the precipice with a loud thump or crash.


síkad

Hiligaynon

To plant one's foot against something for support, take a firm stand as when pulling a rope or the like. Síkad ka sing maáyo sa pagbútong sang kalát. Take a firm stand for pulling the rope. Sikádi (-ári) ang tuód, bató, etc. Plant your foot firmly against the tree-stump, the stone, etc. Isíkad ang tiíl mo sa padér. Put your foot (firmly) against the wall.


sípo

Hiligaynon

To collect-, gather-, scrape-, together (stones, fruit, etc.). Sipóha ang mga páhò, bató, patád, etc. Gather together the mangoes, stones, stakes, etc. (see típon, karipón, hípu, hirípo).


sukáb

Hiligaynon

To lift slightly the edge of, to raise the hem or border as of a mat, carpet, etc. Sukabá ang amákan, kay tan-awón ko kon anó ang árà sa idálum. Raise the mat a little, for I want to see what is underneath it. Ang atóp sinukabán sang hángin sing tátlo ka pánid nga sin. The wind lifted three sheets of galvanized iron off the roof. Ginsukáb níla ang bató kag nasápwan sa idálum ang isá ka dakû nga iwí-íwi. They lifted one side of the stone and discovered underneath a huge scorpion. (see ukáb, sukíb, tukíb).


tábon

Hiligaynon

To cover, envelop, clothe, cloak, overspread the surface of one thing with another, make use of any kind of covering in order to shelter, protect or conceal (hide). Tabóni sing dáhon ang tabungós. Cover the tabungós-basket with leaves. Tinabónan níla sing dútà ang mga bató. They covered (overspread) the stones with earth. Itábon iníng hábul sa masakít nga bátà. Cover the sick child with this blanket. Tabóni ang dápat nga tabónan. Conceal what should be concealed. Hide what should not be seen. Amó ang gintábon níla sa íla sakayán. With that (In that way) they hid (concealed, camouflaged) their boat. Indì na matabónan ang íla ginamús. Their pickled fish (Their bad or secret doings) cannot be hid any longer. (see táplak, tágò, tinagô, hinabón).


talokón

Hiligaynon

(B) To move, stir, shake loose, loosen, lift or shift slightly. Matalokón mo ang bató nga diá? (Maínghit (maíngkà, mahúlag) mo iní nga bató?). Can you move this stone?


támpok

Hiligaynon

Something set within a hole or opening, as a precious stone or jewel set in a ring, or the like; to fill up, fill in, pile up, fill up a hole with earth, rubbish, etc. Tampokí ang búhò sing mga bató. Fill in the hole with stones. Itámpok iníng dútà sa kalóg. Fill in the ditch with this earth. May támpok nga bató ang íya síngsing. Her ring-has a stone setting,-is set with a jewel (precious stone). (see táp-ok).


tíbias

Hiligaynon

To slip, make a false step and slip, to lose one's balance by a false step. Nakatíbias ang tiíl ko sa bató kag natúmba akó. My foot slipped on the stone and I tumbled over. (see dúpias, dalín-as).


tíbong

Hiligaynon

To shoulder, carry on the shoulder, carry a person pickaback (pick-back). Gintíbong níya akó. He carried me on his shoulders. Kon madálum ang túbig sang subâ mapatíbong akó sa táo. If the water of the river is deep I shall have myself carried across on the shoulders of a man. Ipatíbong mo sa íya ang bakág, bató, bátà, etc. Let him carry the basket, the stone, the child, etc. on his shoulder. Tibónga akó sa tabók sa subâ. Carry me pickaback across the river. (see abága, abá).


tigbató

Hiligaynon

A piece, one piece; character, type, letter of the alphabet. (see tig-, bató).


tíkad

Hiligaynon

To take a firm stand by putting one leg forward or backward, to plant-, put-, set-, one's feet firmly against, to dig one's heels into the ground. Gintíkad níya ang íya tiíl sa bató kag ginbútong (butóngon) ang kalát. He set his foot firmly against the stone (rock) and pulled (at) the rope. (see síkad id.).


To fall backwards, fall on one's back, fall supine, fall down face up; to lie on one's back, lie prostrate. Nakadalín-as (Nakadúpias) siá sa nalomótan nga bató kag dáyon nakatikháyà (tumikháyà). He slipped on the mossy stone and down he fell on his back. Tikhayáa (Patikhayáa) siá. Turn him over on his back. Lay him down on his back. (see hayáng, kayâ, tingkáyà, hayâ).


tingkalángan

Hiligaynon

To fall backwards, tumble over on one's back, to drop on one's back off a seat. Natingkalángan siá, kay nalísding ang bató. He tumbled over on his back, for the stone gave way.


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10